Archives for June 2013

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009

Some cool website accessibility images:

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009
website accessibility
Image by U.S. Army Korea (Historical Image Archive)
imcom.korea.army.mil

To learn more about the U.S. Army in Korea today, visit the following websites:
imcom.korea.army.mil
www.youtube.com/imcomkorearegion
www.flickr.com/imcomkorea

Korean war combat newsreels are acquirable online at:
www.youtube.com/warinkorea

The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by Public Law 99-572 on Oct. 28, 1986 "…to honor members of the United Says Armed Forces who served in the Korean War, particularly those who were killed in action, are still missing inaction, or were held as prisoners of war." The law established an advisory board of 12 veterans appointed by the president to coordinate all aspects of the memorial’s construction. The site is located adjacent to the Lincoln Memorial directly crossways the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The American Battle Monuments Commission managed the project and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provided assistance. The architect of record is Cooper Lecky Architects. President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam dedicated the memorial on July 27, 1995. Since the dedication several modifications have been incorporated: a kiosk to wage shelter for National Park Service organisation and a personal system with data housing the "Honor Role," which was accessible to the public. Correcting accessibility issues and replacement of the lighting in the statuary and along the mural surround with a state-of-the-art fiber optic system were required. Reconstruction of the pool and tree grove by the National Park Service and Corps of Engineers to improve tree maintenance and operate the reflecting pool was finished in July 1999. The overall cost for the design and construction of the memorial and kiosk was .5 million.

Statues:

There are 19 statues sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, Vt., and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, N.Y. They are approximately 7’3" tall, heroic scale and consist of 14 Army, 3 Marines, 1 Navy, 1 Air Force. They represent an ethnic cross section of USA with 12 Caucasian, 3 African American, 2 Hispanic, 1 Oriental, 1 Indian (Native American).

The juniper bushes are meant to be symbolic of the rough terrain came crossways in Korea, and the granite stripes of the obstacles overcome in war. The Marines in column have the helmet chin straps fastened and helmet covers. Three of the Army statues are wearing paratrooper boots and all equipment is trusty from the Korean War era (when the war started most of the equipment was WWII issue).

Three of the statues are in the woods, so if you are at the flagpole looking through the troops, you can’t tell how many there are, and could be legions emerging from the woods. The statues are prefabricated of stainless steel, a reflective material that when seen in bright sunlight causes the figures to come to life. The blowing ponchos give motion to the column, so you can feel them travel up the hill with the cold winter wind at their backs, speaking to one another. At nighttime the fronts of the statues are illuminated with a special white light; the finer details of the sculpture are clearly seen and the ghosts appear.

US Army pictures by Edward N. Johnson
IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs Office
Cleared for Public Release.

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009
website accessibility
Image by U.S. Army Korea (Historical Image Archive)
imcom.korea.army.mil

To learn more about the U.S. Army in Korea today, visit the following websites:
imcom.korea.army.mil
www.youtube.com/imcomkorearegion
www.flickr.com/imcomkorea

Korean war combat newsreels are acquirable online at:
www.youtube.com/warinkorea

The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by Public Law 99-572 on Oct. 28, 1986 "…to honor members of the United Says Armed Forces who served in the Korean War, particularly those who were killed in action, are still missing inaction, or were held as prisoners of war." The law established an advisory board of 12 veterans appointed by the president to coordinate all aspects of the memorial’s construction. The site is located adjacent to the Lincoln Memorial directly crossways the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The American Battle Monuments Commission managed the project and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provided assistance. The architect of record is Cooper Lecky Architects. President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam dedicated the memorial on July 27, 1995. Since the dedication several modifications have been incorporated: a kiosk to wage shelter for National Park Service organisation and a personal system with data housing the "Honor Role," which was accessible to the public. Correcting accessibility issues and replacement of the lighting in the statuary and along the mural surround with a state-of-the-art fiber optic system were required. Reconstruction of the pool and tree grove by the National Park Service and Corps of Engineers to improve tree maintenance and operate the reflecting pool was finished in July 1999. The overall cost for the design and construction of the memorial and kiosk was .5 million.

Statues:

There are 19 statues sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, Vt., and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, N.Y. They are approximately 7’3" tall, heroic scale and consist of 14 Army, 3 Marines, 1 Navy, 1 Air Force. They represent an ethnic cross section of USA with 12 Caucasian, 3 African American, 2 Hispanic, 1 Oriental, 1 Indian (Native American).

The juniper bushes are meant to be symbolic of the rough terrain came crossways in Korea, and the granite stripes of the obstacles overcome in war. The Marines in column have the helmet chin straps fastened and helmet covers. Three of the Army statues are wearing paratrooper boots and all equipment is trusty from the Korean War era (when the war started most of the equipment was WWII issue).

Three of the statues are in the woods, so if you are at the flagpole looking through the troops, you can’t tell how many there are, and could be legions emerging from the woods. The statues are prefabricated of stainless steel, a reflective material that when seen in bright sunlight causes the figures to come to life. The blowing ponchos give motion to the column, so you can feel them travel up the hill with the cold winter wind at their backs, speaking to one another. At nighttime the fronts of the statues are illuminated with a special white light; the finer details of the sculpture are clearly seen and the ghosts appear.

US Army pictures by Edward N. Johnson
IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs Office
Cleared for Public Release.

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009
website accessibility
Image by U.S. Army Korea (Historical Image Archive)
imcom.korea.army.mil

To learn more about the U.S. Army in Korea today, visit the following websites:
imcom.korea.army.mil
www.youtube.com/imcomkorearegion
www.flickr.com/imcomkorea

Korean war combat newsreels are acquirable online at:
www.youtube.com/warinkorea

The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by Public Law 99-572 on Oct. 28, 1986 "…to honor members of the United Says Armed Forces who served in the Korean War, particularly those who were killed in action, are still missing inaction, or were held as prisoners of war." The law established an advisory board of 12 veterans appointed by the president to coordinate all aspects of the memorial’s construction. The site is located adjacent to the Lincoln Memorial directly crossways the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The American Battle Monuments Commission managed the project and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provided assistance. The architect of record is Cooper Lecky Architects. President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam dedicated the memorial on July 27, 1995. Since the dedication several modifications have been incorporated: a kiosk to wage shelter for National Park Service organisation and a personal system with data housing the "Honor Role," which was accessible to the public. Correcting accessibility issues and replacement of the lighting in the statuary and along the mural surround with a state-of-the-art fiber optic system were required. Reconstruction of the pool and tree grove by the National Park Service and Corps of Engineers to improve tree maintenance and operate the reflecting pool was finished in July 1999. The overall cost for the design and construction of the memorial and kiosk was .5 million.

Statues:

There are 19 statues sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, Vt., and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, N.Y. They are approximately 7’3" tall, heroic scale and consist of 14 Army, 3 Marines, 1 Navy, 1 Air Force. They represent an ethnic cross section of USA with 12 Caucasian, 3 African American, 2 Hispanic, 1 Oriental, 1 Indian (Native American).

The juniper bushes are meant to be symbolic of the rough terrain came crossways in Korea, and the granite stripes of the obstacles overcome in war. The Marines in column have the helmet chin straps fastened and helmet covers. Three of the Army statues are wearing paratrooper boots and all equipment is trusty from the Korean War era (when the war started most of the equipment was WWII issue).

Three of the statues are in the woods, so if you are at the flagpole looking through the troops, you can’t tell how many there are, and could be legions emerging from the woods. The statues are prefabricated of stainless steel, a reflective material that when seen in bright sunlight causes the figures to come to life. The blowing ponchos give motion to the column, so you can feel them travel up the hill with the cold winter wind at their backs, speaking to one another. At nighttime the fronts of the statues are illuminated with a special white light; the finer details of the sculpture are clearly seen and the ghosts appear.

US Army pictures by Edward N. Johnson
IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs Office
Cleared for Public Release.

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009

Some cool website accessibility images:

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009
website accessibility
Image by U.S. Army Korea (Historical Image Archive)
imcom.korea.army.mil

To learn more about the U.S. Army in Korea today, visit the following websites:
imcom.korea.army.mil
www.youtube.com/imcomkorearegion
www.flickr.com/imcomkorea

Korean war combat newsreels are acquirable online at:
www.youtube.com/warinkorea

The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by Public Law 99-572 on Oct. 28, 1986 "…to honor members of the United Says Armed Forces who served in the Korean War, particularly those who were killed in action, are still missing inaction, or were held as prisoners of war." The law established an advisory board of 12 veterans appointed by the president to coordinate all aspects of the memorial’s construction. The site is located adjacent to the Lincoln Memorial directly crossways the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The American Battle Monuments Commission managed the project and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provided assistance. The architect of record is Cooper Lecky Architects. President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam dedicated the memorial on July 27, 1995. Since the dedication several modifications have been incorporated: a kiosk to wage shelter for National Park Service organisation and a personal system with data housing the "Honor Role," which was accessible to the public. Correcting accessibility issues and replacement of the lighting in the statuary and along the mural surround with a state-of-the-art fiber optic system were required. Reconstruction of the pool and tree grove by the National Park Service and Corps of Engineers to improve tree maintenance and operate the reflecting pool was finished in July 1999. The overall cost for the design and construction of the memorial and kiosk was .5 million.

Statues:

There are 19 statues sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, Vt., and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, N.Y. They are approximately 7’3" tall, heroic scale and consist of 14 Army, 3 Marines, 1 Navy, 1 Air Force. They represent an ethnic cross section of USA with 12 Caucasian, 3 African American, 2 Hispanic, 1 Oriental, 1 Indian (Native American).

The juniper bushes are meant to be symbolic of the rough terrain came crossways in Korea, and the granite stripes of the obstacles overcome in war. The Marines in column have the helmet chin straps fastened and helmet covers. Three of the Army statues are wearing paratrooper boots and all equipment is trusty from the Korean War era (when the war started most of the equipment was WWII issue).

Three of the statues are in the woods, so if you are at the flagpole looking through the troops, you can’t tell how many there are, and could be legions emerging from the woods. The statues are prefabricated of stainless steel, a reflective material that when seen in bright sunlight causes the figures to come to life. The blowing ponchos give motion to the column, so you can feel them travel up the hill with the cold winter wind at their backs, speaking to one another. At nighttime the fronts of the statues are illuminated with a special white light; the finer details of the sculpture are clearly seen and the ghosts appear.

US Army pictures by Edward N. Johnson
IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs Office
Cleared for Public Release.

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009
website accessibility
Image by U.S. Army Korea (Historical Image Archive)
imcom.korea.army.mil

To learn more about the U.S. Army in Korea today, visit the following websites:
imcom.korea.army.mil
www.youtube.com/imcomkorearegion
www.flickr.com/imcomkorea

Korean war combat newsreels are acquirable online at:
www.youtube.com/warinkorea

The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by Public Law 99-572 on Oct. 28, 1986 "…to honor members of the United Says Armed Forces who served in the Korean War, particularly those who were killed in action, are still missing inaction, or were held as prisoners of war." The law established an advisory board of 12 veterans appointed by the president to coordinate all aspects of the memorial’s construction. The site is located adjacent to the Lincoln Memorial directly crossways the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The American Battle Monuments Commission managed the project and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provided assistance. The architect of record is Cooper Lecky Architects. President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam dedicated the memorial on July 27, 1995. Since the dedication several modifications have been incorporated: a kiosk to wage shelter for National Park Service organisation and a personal system with data housing the "Honor Role," which was accessible to the public. Correcting accessibility issues and replacement of the lighting in the statuary and along the mural surround with a state-of-the-art fiber optic system were required. Reconstruction of the pool and tree grove by the National Park Service and Corps of Engineers to improve tree maintenance and operate the reflecting pool was finished in July 1999. The overall cost for the design and construction of the memorial and kiosk was .5 million.

Statues:

There are 19 statues sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, Vt., and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, N.Y. They are approximately 7’3" tall, heroic scale and consist of 14 Army, 3 Marines, 1 Navy, 1 Air Force. They represent an ethnic cross section of USA with 12 Caucasian, 3 African American, 2 Hispanic, 1 Oriental, 1 Indian (Native American).

The juniper bushes are meant to be symbolic of the rough terrain came crossways in Korea, and the granite stripes of the obstacles overcome in war. The Marines in column have the helmet chin straps fastened and helmet covers. Three of the Army statues are wearing paratrooper boots and all equipment is trusty from the Korean War era (when the war started most of the equipment was WWII issue).

Three of the statues are in the woods, so if you are at the flagpole looking through the troops, you can’t tell how many there are, and could be legions emerging from the woods. The statues are prefabricated of stainless steel, a reflective material that when seen in bright sunlight causes the figures to come to life. The blowing ponchos give motion to the column, so you can feel them travel up the hill with the cold winter wind at their backs, speaking to one another. At nighttime the fronts of the statues are illuminated with a special white light; the finer details of the sculpture are clearly seen and the ghosts appear.

US Army pictures by Edward N. Johnson
IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs Office
Cleared for Public Release.

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C., USA, February 2009
website accessibility
Image by U.S. Army Korea (Historical Image Archive)
imcom.korea.army.mil

To learn more about the U.S. Army in Korea today, visit the following websites:
imcom.korea.army.mil
www.youtube.com/imcomkorearegion
www.flickr.com/imcomkorea

Korean war combat newsreels are acquirable online at:
www.youtube.com/warinkorea

The Korean War Veterans Memorial was authorized by Public Law 99-572 on Oct. 28, 1986 "…to honor members of the United Says Armed Forces who served in the Korean War, particularly those who were killed in action, are still missing inaction, or were held as prisoners of war." The law established an advisory board of 12 veterans appointed by the president to coordinate all aspects of the memorial’s construction. The site is located adjacent to the Lincoln Memorial directly crossways the reflecting pool from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.

The American Battle Monuments Commission managed the project and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers provided assistance. The architect of record is Cooper Lecky Architects. President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam dedicated the memorial on July 27, 1995. Since the dedication several modifications have been incorporated: a kiosk to wage shelter for National Park Service organisation and a personal system with data housing the "Honor Role," which was accessible to the public. Correcting accessibility issues and replacement of the lighting in the statuary and along the mural surround with a state-of-the-art fiber optic system were required. Reconstruction of the pool and tree grove by the National Park Service and Corps of Engineers to improve tree maintenance and operate the reflecting pool was finished in July 1999. The overall cost for the design and construction of the memorial and kiosk was .5 million.

Statues:

There are 19 statues sculpted by Frank Gaylord of Barre, Vt., and cast by Tallix Foundries of Beacon, N.Y. They are approximately 7’3" tall, heroic scale and consist of 14 Army, 3 Marines, 1 Navy, 1 Air Force. They represent an ethnic cross section of USA with 12 Caucasian, 3 African American, 2 Hispanic, 1 Oriental, 1 Indian (Native American).

The juniper bushes are meant to be symbolic of the rough terrain came crossways in Korea, and the granite stripes of the obstacles overcome in war. The Marines in column have the helmet chin straps fastened and helmet covers. Three of the Army statues are wearing paratrooper boots and all equipment is trusty from the Korean War era (when the war started most of the equipment was WWII issue).

Three of the statues are in the woods, so if you are at the flagpole looking through the troops, you can’t tell how many there are, and could be legions emerging from the woods. The statues are prefabricated of stainless steel, a reflective material that when seen in bright sunlight causes the figures to come to life. The blowing ponchos give motion to the column, so you can feel them travel up the hill with the cold winter wind at their backs, speaking to one another. At nighttime the fronts of the statues are illuminated with a special white light; the finer details of the sculpture are clearly seen and the ghosts appear.

US Army pictures by Edward N. Johnson
IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs Office
Cleared for Public Release.

Inspiration: Stuff and Nonsense

A few nice website navigation images I found:

Inspiration: Stuff and Nonsense
website navigation
Image by Patrick Haney
Andy Clarke’s redesign pushes layout a bit further than your average
site. I have to appreciate the 2 columns of text wrapping around a
wonderful Kevin Cornell illustration, the easy yet elegant
navigation at the top of the page, and the focus on content. And who
doesn’t love that new logo?

www.stuffandnonsense.co.uk/

patrickhaney.com 2007-05-11
website navigation
Image by Patrick Haney
Screenshot captured with AppleScript and Paparazzi and cropped from
the original.

Things to note:

* The navigation links have a blue background now
* A Suggested box was added (section coming soon)
* h3s get some love
* Tags? Check ’em out!
* Styling for blockquotes added as well

See for yourself!

Inspiration: Sessions by Collective Idea
website navigation
Image by Patrick Haney
The color scheme and captivating background pattern of this site, along with nice typography and minimal navigation, are definitely well place together. But what strikes me about this design the most is that everything I need to know is all right here, not hidden away behind some fancy graphics. After even just a swift glance, I know what Sessions is all about, where the next one is, when it’s being held, what will be covered, who’s speaking, and how to register. Content is king, and in this design, it’s given a gold crown.

Visit the Site: http://sessions.collectiveidea.com/
Read more about this Web Design Inspiration set on Flickr

Most popular Website Accessibility auctions

website accessibility eBay auctions you should keep an eye on:

Usability and Accessibility of Air Force Intranet Web Sites by Richard S....

$49.00
End Date: Friday Mar-2-2018 11:16:19 PST
Buy It Now for only: $49.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Usability and Accessibility of Air Force Intranet Web Sites by Richard S. Bentle
$70.62
End Date: Friday Mar-2-2018 19:02:22 PST
Buy It Now for only: $70.62
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Center for Primary Care Has Been Recognized by the NCQA

Evans, GA (PRWEB) June 26, 2013

Center for Primary Care has been recognized by the NCQA (National Committee for Quality Assurance) from the Diabetes Recognition and the Heart/Stroke Recognition Program for providing calibre care to their patients.

The Heart/Stroke and Diabetes Programs were designed to improve the calibre of care that patients with these diseases receive by recognized physicians.

When patients receive calibre care, they are less likely to suffer additional consequences such as a second heart attack/stroke or for those with diabetes, heart attacks, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and amputations.

In order to receive recognition, which is valid for three years, their doctors had to submit data that demonstrated performance that meets the program’s key care measures and have established a track record of providing excellent, calibre care.

The NCQA is a private, non-profit organization dedicated to improving health care quality. NCQA accredits and certifies a wide range of health care organizations and recognizes clinicians and practices in key areas of performance.

For more information, visit their website http://www.cpcfamilymed.com.

About the company:

Center for Primary Care has been a leader in family medicine for families of the CSRA since 1993. The family medical practice features 27 family doctors, six existing locations throughout the Augusta, GA area. The primary care artefact offers convenient office hours that include, weekday evenings as well as weekend acute care.

CPC provides patients of all ages with the most accessible, convenient, individualized healthcare acquirable in a family practice. Among the many services offered include: routine evaluations, physical exams by a family physician, diagnostic imaging and preventative care. Listings for all six locations, including specific physicians, directions, and hours of operations can be found on the Center for Primary Cares website. For any additional inquires, call the corporate office at 706-650-7799.







Most popular Website Navigation auctions

Some current website navigation auctions on eBay:

Navigation Design and SEO for Content-Intensive Websites : A Guide for an...

$78.95
End Date: Wednesday Mar-21-2018 15:32:58 PDT
Buy It Now for only: $78.95
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Navigation Design And Seo For Content-Intensive Websites
$94.18
End Date: Sunday Mar-4-2018 16:12:03 PST
Buy It Now for only: $94.18
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Maximum Accessibility: Making Your Web Site More Usable for Everyone: 0201774224

website accessibility eBay auctions you should keep an eye on:

Usability and Accessibility of Air Force Intranet Web Sites by Richard S....

$49.00
End Date: Friday Mar-2-2018 11:16:19 PST
Buy It Now for only: $49.00
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Usability and Accessibility of Air Force Intranet Web Sites by Richard S. Bentle
$70.62
End Date: Friday Mar-2-2018 19:02:22 PST
Buy It Now for only: $70.62
Buy It Now | Add to watch list

Drupal Site Building – 2 Day – Madison, WI

Drupal Site Building – 2 Day – Madison, WI
Event on 2013-07-15 09:00:00

In two days, participants will be brought up to speed on Drupal and will be ready to face their own project. Learn how to manage media, build calendars and complex, dynamic queries of content by selecting and configuring the most favourite modules.

Objectives include:

Build complex and powerful functionality
Articulate ideal practices of site building with Drupal
Configure both controlled vocabularies and free tagging with Taxonomy
Manage navigation through Drupalʼs menu system
Configure your site to improve search, through the use of URL path configuration
Be healthy to configure automatically generated thumbnails
Know how to create advanced listings of content
Maintain a secure and speedy website

at University of Wisconsin – Madison
Computer Science Building
Madison, United States

Dunedin Florida Car Accident Lawyers The Berman Law Firm Now Offer Legal Consultations for All Car, Truck, Motorcycle Crash Victims and Personal Injury Cases


Dunedin, Florida (PRWEB) June 23, 2013

The Berman Law Group, a Florida individualized injury law firm, are now offering legal consultations in Dunedin, FL. They are committed to helping anyone who has been hurt in a automobile accident, truck crash, or motorcycle wreck comprehend their legal options and what course of action they can take. The Law Offices of Berman and Berman know that each case is different and work with their clients to get the ideal result for their individual clients’ needs. They are committed to protecting and serving those who are not healthy to navigate the legal options following a automobile happening in Dunedin on their own. Contact the Berman Law Group at (877) 529-8995 if you are looking for a Dunedin automobile happening lawyer.

The Berman Law Firm is now serving the area of Dunedin, Florida, and the surrounding areas of Belleair, Belleair Beach, Indian Rocks Beach, Indian Shores, Oldsmar, Palm Harbor, Safety Harbor, Seminole, St. Petersburg, Tampa, and Pinellas County Florida . If anyone has been hurt in a automobile happening in any of these areas or any in the South Florida, contact the Law Offices of Berman and Berman at 1-877-529-8995 this day and oppose justice before it is too late.

At Berman and Berman, the Dunedin, Florida, automobile happening lawyers strive to get their clients the ideal doable results. If a settlement can't be reached, then they are prepared to take the case to trial. The Berman Law Firm is ready and willing to fight for their clients’ rights and are prepared to follow through on all happening cases if there is a chance to help their clients. Utilizing years of experience and in-depth knowledge of this area of the law, the Berman Law Group is dedicated to protecting the rights and interests of those who have sustained pain and suffering at the hands of a careless party.

At the Law Offices of Berman and Berman, the injury attorneys have devoted themselves and their practice to maintaining the rights and interests of those who have been harmed by the negligence of others. They will defend their clients professional and be aggressive in pursuing restitution for their injuries and losses. Contact the Berman Law Group this day at 1-877-529-8995 for a automobile happening or injury consultation.

To get in contact with the Law Offices of Berman and Berman they can be contacted at 1-(877) 529-8995 or by visiting their website http://lawyerinjuryaccident.com. They are acquirable 24 hours a day via email, phone, or live chat on their website. For help on any type of individualized injury lawsuit in Florida, contact the Berman Law Group today.







More Website Navigation Press Releases

Nomensa: responsive web design is a must-have

Nomensa: responsive web design is a must-have
Simon Norris, CEO of Nomensa, explained that with the predicted growth of mobile, “a website which is responsive and accessible on all devices is a must-have”. He stated that, all too often, businesses have wrongly concentrated heavily on business apps …
Read more on .net magazine

Deque Systems Awarded Computerworld 21st Century Accomplishment Award For
Deque's CEO, Preety Kumar said, "We invented the Amaze web accessibility platform to make a difference in the world. The fact that Amaze enables organizations to make their websites accessible in half the time, at less cost, and more comprehensively …
Read more on PR Newswire (press release)

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