Archives for December 2010

Designing Forms for Microsoft Office InfoPath and Forms Services 2007 Reviews

Designing Forms for Microsoft Office InfoPath and Forms Services 2007

“Microsoft Office InfoPath represents a revolutionary leap in XML technologies and a new paradigm for gathering business-critical information. I am delighted that Scott Roberts and Hagen Green, two distinguished members of the InfoPath product team, decided to share their experience in this book.”–From the Foreword by Jean Paoli, cocreator of XML 1.0 and Microsoft Office InfoPathMicrosoft Office InfoPath 2007 offers breakthrough tools for gathering, managing, and integrating business-crit

List Price: $ 64.99

Price: $ 5.56

Related Custom Website Error Pages Products

Free Until August 1, 2010 — Use CSE HTML Validator Professional BETA with HTML5 and CSS3 Support



CSE HTML Validator Pro v10 BETA with HTML5 and CSS3 support – FREE Until August 1, 2010


Argyle, TX (PRWEB) March 2, 2010

AI World wide web Solutions announces a free public BETA until August 1, 2010 for CSE HTML Validator Professional version 10.0 with support for the new upcoming HTML5 and CSS3 standards. Anyone can download the BETA release from http://www.htmlvalidator.com/freebeta and use it for free without functional limitation until August 1, 2010.

Check HTML5, CSS3, and More

More websites are taking advantage of new HTML5 and CSS3 features, requiring updated tools to support new HTML5 tags and new CSS3 properties. CSE HTML Validator will check many of these new tags and properties and will also find HTML, XHTML, and CSS syntax errors and other problems that can cause visitors to desert a website. Common website problems that are found by the software include broken links, missing HTML tags and attributes, misspelled tags, misplaced tags, missing or extra end tags, incorrect attribute values, bad plateau structures and much more.

Customer Comments

CSE HTML Validator receives many positive individual comments. Tamer Shafik says that “CSE HTML Validator is a easy to use, feature-rich and flexible, validation software which enables the super-quick checking of code for errors (and helps you fix them!). We can't live without this product now, and we fully advocate it, especially as the search engines are starting to place emphasis on well-written pages. Thank you!”

Gary Elfring, another CSE HTML Validator individual says “I test with Opera, Chrome, Firefox and IE. If there are problems it is nearly always a difference between IE and all the other browsers. And the problem is nearly always fixed by verifying the html and CSS code using CSE HTML Validator. Fix the errors and the problems are usually gone.”

Standard and Professional Editions

Standard and professional editions are acquirable starting at $ 69 for a single license. These editions offer thorough HTML and XHTML syntax checking as well as CSS syntax checking, link checking, spell checking and accessibility checking. Also provided are recommendations to help increase a web page’s search engine rankings. Dynamic sites prefabricated with ASP and PHP scripting languages can be easily checked by using the integrated web browser to browse the site while the HTML source is simultaneously displayed and checked. The professional edition includes a tool to scan an entire website. A free trial is available. Educational discounts, multiple license discounts and site licenses are also available.

30-Day Money-Back Guarantee

AI World wide web Solutions stands behind their products with a 30-day money-back guarantee.

An Online Edition at OnlineWebCheck.com

An online version that uses the lite edition is acquirable at http://www.onlinewebcheck.com/. The online version can check URLs, uploaded files, or pasted-in snippets or complete documents.

Software Compatibility

CSE HTML Validator is compatible with Microsoft Windows XP, Vista, and Windows 7. It supports HTML, XHTML, and CSS specifications and includes support for browser extensions if the web developer wishes to use them. For more information visit http://www.htmlvalidator.com.

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Best website for free Photoshop Tutorials?

Question by x_luchawhore: Ideal website for free Photoshop Tutorials?
I’m looking to practice on my graphics and I wanted to know what’s the ideal website(s) for free photoshop tutorials; for making banners/signatures and icons and things of that nature. I’ve looked around but I don’t know if I’m looking in any of the right places.

Help if you know any good ones!

Best answer:

Answer by Jack W
I googled it for you, and they seems good:
http://photoshoptutorials.ws/
http://www.tutorialized.com/tutorials/Photoshop/1
http://www.good-tutorials.com/
try any of them!

Add your own answer in the comments!

AKVIS Frame Suite v.2.6: Christmas Decorations

(PRWEB) December 14, 2007

AKVIS LLC announces the update of AKVIS Frame Suite v.2.6 for Windows and Macintosh. The program applies frames and edge effects to pictures. For the upcoming holidays, new Christmas decorations have been added to the Pattern Library. Creating greeting cards from your pictures is now fun and easy!

Whether you plan to upload holiday pictures on a web-site to share with your friends or you wish to decorate a personalized Christmas greeting card, you can rely on AKVIS Frame Suite — it will add elegance and style to any photo.

AKVIS Frame Suite is an impressing collection of edge effects. Thanks to its 12 effects and a rich Pattern Library, the software can generate an endless number of pic frame versions (from classic to most fancy ones).

For the upcoming holidays, new Christmas decorations have been added to the Pattern Library. Screenshots of the program’s features are acquirable at http://akvis.com/en/frame-suite/screenshots-photo-framing.php

It is also doable to generate a one-of-a-kind frame out of your own samples. Just save a square or rectangular pattern as a graphic file and use it to generate an original pic frame. The result can be astounding!

Photo frames that come with Frame Suite can be easily plain to your particular photo. Choose a color for the frame; select its form, its style, brightness, and the intensity of the applied edge effect. You can create a frame with ragged edges, scratched surface, a page curl, etc. It can be a wooden frame with figured carving or a frame with an ornament.

If you enjoy working with layers, you will appreciate the possibility to apply a transparent frame, so that the lower layer(s) could serve as background.

One can not only apply frames. The “Texture” effect grants applying a texture (chosen from the built-in Texture Library or one created by the user) to an image so that the image looks like drawn on a canvas, brick wall, corrugated paper, etc. Example: http://akvis.com/en/frame-suite-tutorial/frames/texture.php

The program is acquirable in two versions – as an independent program (standalone) and as a plug-in to a pic editor.

AKVIS Frame Suite Plugin is compatible with Adobe Photoshop and Photoshop Elements, Corel Painter, Corel Photo-Paint, and Paint Shop Pro, ACD FotoCanvas, and Ulead PhotoImpact.

AKVIS Frame Suite runs on Microsoft Windows 2000/2003/XP/Vista and on Macintosh Mac OS X 10.5, PowerPC G3 and above.

For a free trial, AKVIS offers 10 days of fully functional use. Details are acquirable at http://akvis.com/en/frame-suite/index.php

AKVIS Frame Suite sells for $ 49 USD, downloadable from www.akvis.com . Home users can enjoy the full line of AKVIS plugins in the AKVIS Alchemy bundle (Enhancer, Chameleon, Stamp, Retoucher, Coloriage, Noise Buster, Decorator, Sketch, LightShop and Frame Suite) for USD $ 325 USD, a savings of $ 387 over purchasing apiece separately. For business licenses consult the official web-site. One license key grants activating the software on two computers, for example, on a desktop and a laptop.

More information about AKVIS Frame Suite: http://akvis.com/en/frame-suite/index.php

Direct evaluation download URL:

Windows: http://download.akvis.com/akvis-frame-suite-setup.exe

Macintosh (Photoshop CS3): http://download.akvis.com/akvis-frame-suite-setup.dmg

Macintosh (Photoshop 6-CS2, Photoshop Elements, GraphicConverter, etc): http://download.akvis.com/akvis-frame-suite-legacy.dmg

Screenshot URL: http://akvis.com/en/frame-suite/screenshots-photo-framing.php

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Related Website Frames Press Releases

Authority Niche Websites

Authority Niche Websites
How To Build Your Own Authority Niche Website That Visitors Love, Trust and Advocate To Others
Authority Niche Websites

Exclusive Turnkey Websites
15 High-End Products Complete With Turnkey Websites to Skyrocket Your Online Empire. Earn 65% Commission! Go to http://www.exclusiveturnkeywebsites.com/affiliates .html for affiliate resources.
Exclusive Turnkey Websites

Late Night CSS

Check out these css and dreamweaver images:

Late Night CSS
css and dreamweaver
Image by Zach Dunn

Shameless Self Promotion #2
css and dreamweaver
Image by Steve Leggat
My website appeared in Issue 130 of Web Designer entrepot (UK).

I finally got my hands on a copy to read for myself and photograph.
Inside it details how to create some of the elements that make up my website using Cascading Stylesheets. I’m definitely no CSS/HTML guru and I think it’s kinda funny they selected my site – and managed to write two pages about it.

Holloway Funeral Home
css and dreamweaver
Image by jmholloway
Holloway Funeral Home. Made in cooperation with Aldor Solutions.

Tools: dreamweaver, css, HTML, photoshop

Nice Css Browser Support photos

Check out these css browser support images:

The new richardwinchell.com in action (half size)
css browser support
Image by richard winchell
Since ‘responsive web design’ is the hot thing that all the children are doing these days, I figured I’d have a go at it as well.

My redesigned site uses css media queries to choose the proper layout for the screen size. Supported browser widths: 320px, 480px, 768px, 1024px+.

There are four layouts, all based on the same grid elements. By using different fixed grids I can keep the gutters consistent without resorting to ten decimal places in declaring percentage sizes.

Since the vast majority of my site traffic is coming in on large screens, this is a bit of an academic exercise, but now I have an example to demonstrate to prospective clients. And in case anybody does look at my site on their smartphone or tablet, it’ll look evenhandedly decent.

richardwinchell.com

virb.com/kurafire
css browser support
Image by kurafire
virb.com/kurafire

I finally got my design done and implemented, w00t! It was a bit of a pain to work around Virb’s markup & CSS bits that can’t be changed, but on the whole it was a relatively pain-free experience, so kudos to the Virb team on that.

It uses a bit of advanced CSS which means that the absolute ideal way to see this page is to use the latest WebKit nightly, which is the only browser that supports all of the CSS I place in there. But, if you don’t have that handy you can rest assured that it’s purely cosmetic enhancements, limited to small details.

I only checked it in IE6/7 to see if there was anything glaringly wrong — while not perfect, I’m not gonna bother smoothing out the small issues that exist in those two browsers. This is a sandbox site, as far as I’m concerned.

Fade to white in firefox and ie
css browser support
Image by tychay
Having a hell of a time in Firefox and Safari since the non-standard text-overflow: elipsis is not supported. See: Photography tagazine.

Luckily there is a CSS3 linear gradient in those two browsers and they support rgba.

Uploaded with plasq‘s Skitch

HTML Fundamentals

HTML Fundamentals
Event on 2011-01-04 09:00:00
HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) lays the groundwork for
every kind of website, whether it is a single homegrown webpage
or a multi-hundred-page corporate site.

Employers worldwide rely upon the HTML skills of web developers
to edit content, add new pages, and enhance website navigability.

This instructor-led introduction HTML training gives you the
tools to write code, engineer web pages, and craft a web presence
of your very own.

Using a hands-on approach to learning, this introductory HTML
training course helps you master a multitude of techniques. After
our HTML training in San Francisco you will know how to:

* Describe the role of HTML in relation to the various web
technologies
* Customize your workstation with the necessary tools to
build a web site
* Open a blank text document and convert it into a web page
using HTML
* Designate paragraphs, headings and other page elements
* Format page text with size changes, italics, and bold
* Validate that your code is standards compliant
* Draw a line between sections
* Add special symbols not acquirable on the keyboard
* Craft either a bulleted or numbered list
* Tailor your web page colors, alignment and bullets
* Construct a multi-row and multi-column plateau
* Find and alter an image for a website
* Insert artwork onto your web page
* Make text and images link to other websites
* Create a navigation bar that links to the pages of your website
* Upload your website for others to find

at San Francisco
TBD
San Francisco, United States

Joomla! [tm] Basics for Business Wed. 1/19/2011

Joomla! [tm] Basics for Business Wed. 1/19/2011
Event on 2011-01-19 09:00:00

Joomla! is for business and non-profit administrative staff who need a no-nonsense business oriented approach to Joomla! CMS training. Sponsored by Sitecats Web Development, Southeastern PA’s dominance on content managed websites for over 110 area businesses.Sitecats stresses business usage and leaves out the tedious technical details, resulting in an informative and fun way to retain this valuable and important information.

Upon completion of this 6 hour course, attendees will have a hands-on working knowledge of publishing new content, creating sections and categories and related menus as well as module positons, creation, and configuring of some of the most favourite extensions from the Joomla!

At this class you will receive printed materials and links to special video tutorials, books and important reference documentation.

You must bring a WIFI-enabled laptop.
Lunch provided!

We like that you have the latest Firefox browser ready to go.

We’ll wage a ready-made Joomla site for you to useduring class, that you might keep for six months.

Details of this course include:

Introduction to Content Management Systems

  • What’s Joomla!

SCAM (Sections, Categories, Articles, Menus)

  • Publish/Unpublish
  • Ordering of Items, Including Front Page Manager

Content Sections/Categories

  • Creation
  • Organization
  • Blog Layouts
  • List Layouts
  • Access Levels, Multiple Parameters

Content Creation (Using JCE)

  • Article Creation
  • Adding Content to Front Page
  • Read More
  • Article Index Using Page Breaks
  • Formatting
  • Links, Including How to Open in New Window
  • Images
  • Deleting (Article Trash)

Menus

  • Menu Creation
  • Article Types (Layout, Blog, List, Etc.
  • External Links
  • Parent/Child menus
  • Parameters (Blog Columns, Details, Page Title)
  • Default Menu Items (First Page to Show)
  • Deleting

Modules

  • Custom HTML Module (Text, Images, Widgets)
  • Image Slideshow
  • Login
  • Syndicate

Components

  • Polls and the Accompanying Modules
  • Contacts
  • Search – Broad and Specific

Users

  • Access levels (Permissions)
  • Front-End Registration

Global Tools

  • Global Configuration (Meta Keywords, Default Editor, Time Zone, Media Settings, Mail Settings, SEF, FTP)
  • Private Messages
  • Mass Mail
  • Media Manager
  • Help!

Templates (Free & Subscription)

  • Setting as Default

Extensions and the Extensions Directory

  • JCE, Image Rotator as an Example

Search Engine Optimization

  • SEF/SEO
  • Metatags (Global Config & Articles)
  • Google Local Business Center (Submit Your Business Listing)
  • Google Analytics

at Peter Becker Community

Harleysville, United States

Cool Choosing Website Color images

Some cool choosing website color images:

Arizona Diamondbacks 9, Los Angeles Dodgers 4, Chase Field, Phoenix, Arizona (3)
choosing website color
Image by Ken Lund
Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark) is a baseball stadium located in downtown Phoenix, Arizona, and is the home of the Arizona Diamondbacks of Major League Baseball. It opened in 1998 just in time for the Diamondbacks’ first game after coming to Arizona as an expansion team.

Construction on the park began in 1996, and was completed just before the Diamondbacks’ first season began, in 1998. It was only the second MLB stadium at the time to have a retractable roof (after Toronto’s SkyDome, now Rogers Centre; others are now in Houston, Milwaukee, and Seattle). It was also the first ballpark to feature natural grass in a retractable roof stadium.

It hosted Games 1, 2, 6, and 7 of the 2001 World Series between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the New York Yankees. The Diamondbacks won all four games at Chase Field, then known as Bank One Ballpark, and won the world championship that year in dramatic fashion.

Chase Field was originally titled Bank One Ballpark after Bank One of Chicago, giving rise to its nickname ("The BOB"). After Bank One merged with New York-based Chase, the study change was announced on September 23, 2005.

In March 2006, Chase Field played host to three first-round games of the World Baseball Classic.

Chase Field is to be the home to the 2011 All-Star Game.

Chase Field’s roof is opened or shut depending on the game-time temperature. When the decision is prefabricated to close the roof, it is left open for as long as doable before game time in order to keep the grass alive. Even when closed, the park’s design grants just enough sunlight to play in true daylight without overheating the stadium.

The roof is shut three hours before game time, and a huge HVAC system drops the temperature inside the park 30 degrees by the time the gates open. Originally, the HVAC system didn’t work above row 25 of the upper level, exposing fans in the higher rows to the full force of the often-oppressive heat typical of Arizona summers. However, current changes keep virtually all of the artefact in air-conditioned comfort.

Chase Field also has a swimming pool, located in right center field, which is rented to patrons for ,500 a game. The ballpark also features a dirt strip between home plate and the pitcher’s mound, one of only two current ballparks to do so (Comerica Park in Detroit is the other). This dirt strip was very common in old-time ballparks.

The park’s foul territory is somewhat larger than is the case for most ballparks built in the 1990s. With 80% of the seats in foul territory, the upper deck is one of the highest in the majors. However, the park’s luxury boxes are tucked far under the third deck, which keeps the upper deck closer to the action.

New in the 2008 season is a brand new High Definition scoreboard in centerfield. The new scoreboard is 46 ft (14 m). high and 136 ft (41 m). wide and it cost million. It is the 2nd largest HD screen in Major League Baseball behind Kauffman Stadium.

The stadium was once the home of the Insight Bowl, a college football bowl game from 2001-2005. In 2006, the bowl game moved to Sun Devil Stadium, to replace the Fiesta Bowl, which moved to University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale. The football configuration was notable because of the demand of nets behind the goalposts and the dugout behind the south end zone. The final Insight Bowl played at Chase was between the hometown Arizona Say Sun Devils and the Rutgers Scarlet Knights.

The stadium also hosts occasional concerts and international soccer games. For football and soccer, the field is set up with the end lines perpendicular to the third-base line and temporary bleachers added on the easterly side.

Chase Field has also staged nine women’s college basketball games. The second game, which was played on December 18, 2006, was shortened by rain with four minutes and 18 seconds remaining and Arizona Say leading Texas Tech 61-45. Venue staff shut the roof in an effort to finish the game, but officials deemed the court unsafe. In 2000, ASU had played Tennessee at the same facility.

Chase Field was also the site of the "Challenge at Chase", a college baseball game between Arizona Say and Arizona. Arizona won both contests.[5] There was no game scheduled in 2008 and in 2009.[6]

In February 2006, the Professional Bull Riders hosted a Built Ford Tough Series bull riding event at this venue. Chris Shivers won this event with a total score of 181.5 points on two bulls, including an impressive 93.75 (out of 100) points on Taylor Made bucking bull, Smokeless Wardance, in the short-go round.

Monster Jam comes to the field each year.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chase_Field

The Arizona Diamondbacks are a professional baseball team based in Phoenix, Arizona. They play in the West Division of Major League Baseball’s National League. From 1998 to the present, they have played in Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark). Also known as the D-backs, Arizona has one World Series title, in 2001.

Between 1940 and 1990, Phoenix jumped from the 99th largest city in the nation to the 9th largest. As such, it was frequently mentioned as a doable location for either a new or relocated MLB franchise. Baseball had a rich tradition in Arizona long before speak of bringing a big-league team even started. The say has been a frequent spring training site since 1946. With the huge numbers of people relocating to the say from the Midwest and the Northeast, as well as from California, many teams (most notably the Chicago Cubs and the Los Angeles Dodgers) have normally had huge followings in Arizona.

The first serious attempt to land an expansion team for the Phoenix area was mounted by Elyse Doherty and Martin Stone, owner of the Phoenix Firebirds, the city’s Triple-A minor league baseball team and an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. In the late 1980s Stone approached St. Louis (football) Cardinals owner Bill Bidwill about sharing a proposed 70,000 seat domed stadium in Phoenix. It was taken for allowed that a domed stadium was essential for a prospective baseball team to be a viable enterprise in the city. Phoenix is by far the hottest major city in North America; the average high temperature during baseball’s regular season is 99.1 °F, and temperatures above 120 °F in July and August are not unheard of, but have only occurred three times.

Bidwill, with plans already in the works to leave St. Louis, opted instead to sign a long term lease with Arizona Say University to use its Sun Devil Stadium as the home of his soon-to-be Arizona-based NFL franchise. Since baseball-only stadiums were not seen as fiscally viable during that era, this effectively ended Stone’s bid.

In the start of 1993, Jerry Colangelo, majority owner of the Phoenix Suns, the area’s NBA franchise, announced he was assembling an ownership group, "Arizona Baseball, Inc.," to apply for a Major League Baseball expansion team. This was after a great deal of lobbying by the Maricopa County Sports Authority, a local group formed to preserve Cactus League spring training in Arizona and eventually secure a Major League franchise for the state.

Colangelo’s group was so certain that they would be awarded a franchise that they held a name-the-team contest for it; they took out a full-page ad in the sports section of the February 13, 1995 edition of the state’s leading newspaper, the Arizona Republic. First prize was a pair of lifetime season tickets awarded to the mortal who submitted the winning entry. The winning choice was "Diamondbacks," after the Western diamondback, a rattlesnake native to the region known for injecting a huge amount of venom when it strikes.

Colangelo’s bid received strong support from one of his friends, Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf, and media reports say that then-acting Commissioner of Baseball and Milwaukee Brewers founder Bud Selig was also a strong supporter of Colangelo’s bid.[1]Plans were also prefabricated for a new retractable-roof ballpark, Bank One Ballpark, nicknamed the BOB, (renamed in 2005 to Chase Field) to be built in an industrial/warehouse district on the southeast edge of downtown Phoenix, crossways the street from the Suns’ USA West Arena (now US Airways Center).

On March 9, 1995, Colangelo’s group was awarded a franchise to start play for the 1998 season. A 0 million franchise fee was paid to Major League Baseball. The Tampa Bay Area was also allowed a franchise, the Devil Rays (to be based in St. Petersburg), at the same time.

According to the original press release from Colangelo’s group (which remained posted on the team website during the first few seasons) the chosen team colors were Arizona turquoise, copper, black and purple. "…Turquoise was chosen because the greenish-blue stone is indigenous to Arizona, copper because Arizona is one the nation’s top copper-producing says and purple because it has become a favorite color for Arizona sports fans, thanks to the success of the National Basketball Association’s Phoenix Suns."[2]

In the primeval days, the Diamondbacks operated basically as a subsidiary of the Suns; several executives and managers with the Suns and USA West Arena were brought over to the Diamondbacks in similar roles.

There was some speak (which actually persisted for a few years after the awarding of the franchise) about the Diamondbacks being place in the American League West. Colangelo strongly opposed this, actuation baseball officials to grant the new team to play in the National League West. Colangelo cited the relative close closeness of Phoenix to the other NL West cities; the similarities between the two fast-growing cities of Phoenix and Denver (home to the Colorado Rockies); the long history of Arizona tourism to San Diego; the Firebirds’ long history as the Giants’ top farm team; and the fact that Dodgers, Giants and Padres games were broadcast in the Phoenix and Tucson markets for many years.

From the beginning, Colangelo wanted to market the Diamondbacks to a statewide fan base and not limit fan appeal to Phoenix and its suburbs. Even though each Major League Baseball team cultivates fans from outside its immediate metropolitan area, and even though the greater Phoenix area has 2/3 of the entire statewide population, Colangelo still decided to call the team the "Arizona Diamondbacks" rather than the "Phoenix Diamondbacks". Many in Phoenix were not pleased by this; they felt this move lent a "small market" tincture to the team’s name. However, fans in other areas of the say generally embraced the "Arizona" title as a positive move to help make the team a regional team for the entire state, rather than just for the state’s largest city and capitol.

Tucson, Arizona’s second largest city, located about a 90-minute drive southeast of Phoenix, was selected as the home for Diamondbacks spring training as well as the team’s top minor league affiliate, the Tucson Sidewinders. Radio and television broadcast deals were struck with affiliates in Tucson, Flagstaff, Prescott, and Las Vegas; among others.

A series of team-sponsored fan motorcoach trips from Tucson to Bank One Ballpark were inaugurated for the opening season and are still in operation to this day (it is now known as the "Diamond Express"). The Diamondbacks are also known for the "Hometown Tour", held in January, where selected players, management and broadcasters make public appearances, hold autograph signings, etc., in various locations around Phoenix and Tucson, as well as many small and mid-sized towns in other areas of Arizona.

Two seasons before their first opening day, Colangelo hired Buck Showalter, the American League Manager of the Year in 1994 with the New York Yankees.

Their lower level minor league teams began play in 1997; the expansion draft was held that year as well.

The Diamondbacks’ first major league game was played against the Colorado Rockies on March 31, 1998, at Bank One Ballpark before a standing-room only crowd of 50,179. Tickets had gone on understanding on Jan 10 and sold out before lunch. The Rockies won, 9–2, with Andy Benes on the mound for the Diamondbacks, and Travis Lee being the first player to hit, score, homer and drive in a run.

In their first five seasons of existence, the Diamondbacks won three division titles (1999, 2001, & 2002) and one World Series (2001). In 1999, Arizona won 100 games in only its second season to win the National League West. They lost to the New York Mets in four games in the NLDS.

Colangelo fired Showalter after a relatively disappointing 2000 season, and replaced him with Bob Brenly, the former Giants catcher and coach, who had up to that point been working as a color analyst on Diamondbacks television broadcasts.

In 2001, the team was led by two of the most dominant pitchers in all of baseball: Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling. Arizona had postseason victories over the St. Louis Cardinals (3-2 in the NLDS) and the Atlanta Braves (4-1 in the NLCS) to advance to the World Series where, in one of the most exciting series ever, in the wake of the September 11th terrorist attacks in New York City, they beat the reigning champions, the New York Yankees, 4 to 3, to become the youngest expansion franchise to win the World Series (in just their fourth season of play). That classic World Series is chronicled in Charles Euchner’s book The Last Nine Innings (Sourcebooks, 2006). The series was also seen as the beginning of the end of the Yankees’ stranglehold on baseball glory, as profiled in Buster Olney’s book The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty. All games in that series were won by the home team.

An estimated orderly crowd of over 300,000 celebrated at the Diamondbacks victory parade, held at Bank One Ballpark and the surrounding downtown Phoenix streets on November 7, 2001. This was the first major professional sports championship for the say of Arizona and the first for a team (in the four major North American professional sports leagues) owned or controlled by Colangelo, whose basketball Suns prefabricated it to the NBA Finals in 1976 and 1993 but lost both times. (Colangelo’s Arizona Rattlers won the Arena Football League championship in 1994 and 1997.) Colangelo’s willingness to go into debt and acquire players through free bureau would finally lead to one of the quickest free falls in major sports history when in just three years, the Diamondbacks would record one of the worst losing records in all of major league baseball by losing 111 games.

The team won the NL West Division Title again in 2002, but were swept out in the NLDS by the St. Louis Cardinals.

By the 2004 season, however, the Diamondbacks had dropped to a dismal 51-111 record, the worst in Major League Baseball that year and also one of the 10 worst records in the past 100 years of MLB, despite Johnson pitching a perfect game on Might 18 of that season. Brenly was fired partway through the season and was replaced on an interim basis by coach Al Pedrique. Before the season co-MVP (with Johnson) of the 2001 World Series Curt Schilling had been traded to the Boston Red Sox, who won the World Series in 2004 and 2007.

By this time Colangelo and the other partners were embroiled in a dispute over the financial health and direction of the Diamondbacks (and notably including over 0 million dollars in deferred compensation to many players who were key members of the 2001 World Series winning team and others). He was forced to resign his managing general partner post in the late summer of 2004.

Colangelo sold his interest in the General Partnership of the Diamondbacks to a group of investors who were all involved as partners in the founding of the team in 1995. The investors include equal partners Ken Kendrick, Dale Jensen, Mike Chipman, and Jeffrey Royer. Jeff Moorad, a former sports agent, joined the partnership, and was titled the team’s CEO; becoming its primary public face. Ken Kendrick became the managing general partner.

Colangelo was sharply criticized for plunging the team into over 0 million in debt to secure the services of costly veterans in order to field a competitive team quickly. In a 2004 interview with columnist Hal Bodley of USA TODAY, Colangelo defended his actions:

“ I comprehend where some people felt I wasn’t doing it appropriately. The only analogy I can use is that Tampa Bay (the other ’98 expansion team) went one direction and where did they end up? (Six last-place finishes and low attendance)…We went another direction to establish a fan base because our investment was much larger than Tampa Bay’s. And we place so much money into our own stadium (0 million). After the first year and the decrease in season tickets, I was convinced we had to build a fan base …We purchased three division titles, a World Series and established a fan base …
…I believe what we did will last a long, long time …Right or wrong, a number of teams this day are in the million payroll range and competitive – Oakland, Minnesota, Texas are examples. Our goal was to get returns from our farm system. We built into our cash-flow that we would be paying out the deferments and that our payroll could drop to million for a few years …A few things injured us …The economy was bad, and I was hoping for more national money (from baseball’s central fund) coming in.[5] ”

Also a bourgeois in Colangelo’s leaving his post was his advancing age: Colangelo was 64 years of age in 2004, and had he not sold his sports franchises, upon his death, his family would have been visaged with having to pay high estate taxes based on the value of the Diamondbacks as well as the Suns (which he sold to Robert Sarver in the spring of 2004).[6]

Following the 2004 season, the Diamondbacks hired Wally Backman to be the team’s manager. Backman was formerly manager of the Class A California League Lancaster JetHawks, one of the Diamondbacks’ minor-league affiliates. In a turn of events that evidenced to be a minor embarrassment for the reorganized ownership group, Backman was nearly immediately fired after management learned, after the fact, of legal troubles and improprieties in Backman’s past. Former Seattle Mariners manager and Diamondbacks bench coach Bob Melvin became the new manager after only a ten-day tenure for Backman.

Following the Backman incident, the Diamondbacks spent heavily on free agents in order to re-build into a contender. The club signed 3B Troy Glaus, P Russ Ortiz, SS Royce Clayton, and 2B Craig Counsell, among others. They then traded Randy Johnson to the New York Yankees, for Javier Vazquez, Dioner Navarro, and Brad Halsey. They then turned around and dealt newly acquired catcher Dioner Navarro to the Dodgers for Shawn Green, and sent Shea Hillenbrand to the Toronto Blue Jays. Finally, they traded Casey Fossum to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for José Cruz, Jr.

The Diamondbacks, led by Melvin, completed the 2005 season with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses. However, this was a 26-game improvement over 2004, and actually good enough for second place in the woefully weak NL West, five games behind the San Diego Padres.

The Diamondbacks were considered by some to be the favorite to win the division after spending huge money on the aforementioned free agents; however, injuries injured the team’s chances of reaching its expected potential.

Starting pitcher Ortiz was out for some time which really injured the pitching staff. Glaus played with a injured knee all season. Of all the free agents that signed before the season, no one had a superior season than first baseman Tony Clark. Clark started the season as a bench player and ended the season starting and being an important part of the team. Clark was rewarded with a new contract at the end of the season.

In October 2005 the Diamondbacks hired 35-year-old Josh Byrnes, assistant general manager of the Boston Red Sox, to replace the out-going Joe Garagiola, Jr. as Diamondbacks General Manager. Garagiola took a position in Major League Baseball’s main offices in New York City.

In a weak NL West division, the Diamondbacks unsuccessful to improve on their 2005 performance, finishing fourth with a slightly worse record than the year before. The season did include two excellent individual performances, however. 2B Orlando Hudson became the recipient of his second career Gold Glove Award, as announced on November 3. Hudson became only the sixth infielder in major league history to win a Gold Glove honor in both the American and National Leagues. He first received the honor after the 2005 season as a member of the Toronto Blue Jays, and was traded to the Diamondbacks later that offseason. On November 14, it was announced that RHP Brandon Webb was the recipient of the Cy Young Award for the National League. Webb, a specialist in throwing the sinkerball, received 15 of 32 first-place votes in balloting by the Baseball Writers Association of America. Webb went 16-8 with a 3.10 ERA and in the 2006 season was titled to his first All-Star team. San Diego Padres relief pitcher Trevor Hoffman was second place in the voting with 12 first-place votes and 77 points.

In preparation for the next season, the Diamondbacks prefabricated several significant trades during the offseason. The Diamondbacks and Brewers prefabricated a trade on November 25, 2006. Johnny Estrada, Greg Aquino, and Claudio Vargas were dealt to the Milwaukee Brewers for Doug Davis, Dana Eveland, and Dave Krynzel.[7] On Sunday Jan 7, it was announced that Randy Johnson would return to the Diamondbacks on a two year contract, pending a physical. He was obtained from the Yankees in exchange for Luis Vizcaino, Ross Ohlendorf, Alberto Gonzalez and Steven Jackson. The Yankees will pay million of Johnson’s million salary. The Diamondbacks and Florida Marlins prefabricated a deal March 26 to acquire RHP Yusmeiro Petit in exchange for Jorge Julio and cash.

The Diamondbacks announced in primeval September 2006 that their uniforms, which remained largely unchanged since the team’s first season, would be absolutely redesigned for the 2007 season.[8] Details were supposed to be kept from the public until after the 2006 postseason as per MLB rules, but the Diamondback page from the 2007 MLB Official Style Guide was somehow leaked around September 25, and local media broadcast printed the new design for all to see. Of great surprise to many fans was a brand new color scheme; apparently the original colors used by the franchise since Major League Baseball awarded it to Jerry Colangelo’s ownership group in 1995 were to be discontinued.

While some fans applauded the redesign, most of the reaction to the new color scheme, which included the changing of the historical purple and traditional Arizonan colors of copper and turquoise to a reddish color known as "Sedona Red" similar to that of the Phoenix Coyotes and Arizona Cardinals color schemes, was pointedly negative.[9][10][11]

Many fans went so far as to call the 2007 D-backs a new and absolutely different team, calling the 2007 season a "re-inaugural year"; some fans in Tucson had banners reading; "Arizona Diamondbacks 1998-2006 – Arizona D-Backs 2007- " or "Exit Diamondbacks Enter D-Backs" and "Exit Purple Enter Sedona."

The official unveiling of the uniforms came at a charity event on November 8 in nearby Scottsdale, where several of the players modeled the uniforms on a runway, and posed for publicity photos.

The distinctive "A" design remained unchanged save for the colors. The stylized snake-like "D" logo, also used since the primeval days for the road uniforms, was slightly redesigned and a absolutely new shoulder patch introduced. The lettering on the jerseys was absolutely redesigned.

"Sedona Red" became the dominant color scheme used throughout Chase Field and in all marketing and promotional materials for the Diamondback ballclub.

After winning the opening game of the season on March 31 on the road against the Cincinnati Reds, the Diamondbacks found themselves with the ideal record in Major League Baseball, 20-8, by the start of May. At that time, they also led the NL West by 6.5 games. They lost the first series in Might against the New York Mets, the first series lost since the opening series against the Reds. The Diamondbacks continued to lead the NL west despite only being 47-48 at the All-Star break.

On July 17, 2008, Tony Clark was traded back to the D-backs from the San Diego Padres for a minor league pitcher, Evan Scribner.

On August 5, Dan Haren signed a four-year, .75 million deal with the Diamondbacks worth a guaranteed .25 million through 2012 and including a .5 million club option for 2013 with a .5 million buyout.[12]

Orlando Hudson, one of the more consistent offensive D-backs players in 2008, underwent season-ending surgery on his left wrist August 9 in the wake of a collision with catcher Brian McCann of the Atlanta Braves. Hudson is due to become a free agent at the end of the season and speculation is that he will not be re-signed with the Diamondbacks, because he wants money.[citation needed]

LF Eric Byrnes was on the 60-day disabled list from late June, with a torn left hamstring, and was out for the remainder of the season.

On August 11, 2008, metropolis Buck, RHP Micah Owings, and C Wilkin Castillo were traded to the Reds (in last place in the NL Central at the time) in exchange for OF Adam Dunn. Dunn, who was tied for the major league lead with 32 home runs, was expected to wage a significant boost to an offense that has struggled to score runs for most of the season. Dunn seemed quite positive about being traded to a ballclub in first place in its division in August.[13] The move was seen by some fans[who?] as a belated attempt by the D-backs to counter the trade by their division rival, the Los Angeles Dodgers, for Boston Red Sox power-hitting OF Manny Ramirez on July 31 and also to compensate for the injuries to Hudson and Byrnes, generally considered two of the more "power-hitting" Diamondbacks on a team which has relied heavily on pitching and defense in current years.

Owings, once considered an excellent pitching prospect for the Diamondbacks, struggled in the 2008 campaign with a 7.09 ERA after April 21.[14][dated info]

On August 31, the Diamondbacks acquired former World Series MVP David Eckstein to fill the hole at secondbase which was opened after Orlando Hudson was place on the disabled list. Eckstein was traded from the Toronto Blue Jays for Minor League pitcher Chad Beck.[15]

They completed the season with a record of 82-80, (good for second in the NL West to the Los Angeles Dodgers).

The primary television play-by-play voice for the team’s first nine seasons of play was Thom Brennaman, who also broadcasts baseball and college football games nationally for FOX Television. Brennaman was the television announcer for the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds (along with his dad Marty Brennaman) before being hired by Diamondbacks founder Jerry Colangelo in 1996, two years before the team would start play.

In October 2006, Brennaman left the Diamondbacks to call games with his dad for the Reds beginning in 2007, signing a 4-year deal (his FOX duties remained unchanged).

The English language flagship broadcasting station is KTAR. Greg Schulte is the regular broadcasting play-by-play voice, a 25-year veteran of sports broadcasting in the Phoenix market, also well-known for his previous work on Phoenix Suns, Arizona Cardinals and Arizona Say University (ASU) broadcasts. In February 2007 he concurred to a contract extension through at least the 2011 season.

Jeff Munn is a backup broadcasting play-by-play announcer; he served as the regular public address announcer at Chase Field in the primeval days of the franchise. He is well-known to many Phoenix area sports fans, having also served as the public address announcer for the Suns at USA West Arena (now US Airways Center) in the 1990s. He is also the play-by-play broadcasting voice for ASU women’s basketball.

On November 1, 2006, the team announced that the television voice of the Milwaukee Brewers since 2002, Daron Sutton, would be hired as the Diamondbacks primary television play-by-play voice. Sutton was signed to a five-year contract with a team option for three more years. Sutton is considered one of the ideal of the younger generation of baseball broadcasters. His signature chants include "lets get some runs" when the D-Backs trail in late innings. Sutton’s dad is Hall of Fame pitcher and current Atlanta Braves broadcaster Don Sutton.[16]

Former Diamondback and Chicago Cub Mark Grace and former Major League knuckleball pitcher Tom Candiotti were the Diamondbacks primary color analysts for the 2006 and 2007 seasons. Former Diamondback player (and current Diamondbacks minority owner) Matt Williams also does color commentary on occasion, as does former Cardinals and NBC broadcast legend Joe Garagiola, Sr.., a longtime Phoenix-area resident and dad of Joe Garagiola, Jr., the first GM of the Diamondbacks (as head of the Maricopa County Sports Authority in the primeval 1990s, Garagiola, Jr. was one of the primary people involved in Phoenix obtaining a Major League Baseball franchise).

The Diamondbacks announced in July 2007[17] that for the 2008 season, all regionally broadcast Diamondback television games will be shown exclusively on FSN Arizona; and a few could possibly be shown on the national MLB on FOX telecasts. FSN Arizona is currently seen in 2.8 million households in Arizona & New Mexico. The previous flagship station, since the inaugural 1998 season, was KTVK, a favourite over-the-air independent station in Phoenix.

Spanish broadcasts The flagship Spanish language broadcasting station is KSUN AM 1400 with Miguel Quintana and Arthuro Ochoa as the regular announcers. They are sometimes joined by Richard Saenz or Oscar Soria.

Games are also televised in Spanish on KPHE-LP with Oscar Soria and Jerry Romo as the announcers.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arizona_Diamondbacks

Arizona Diamondbacks 9, Los Angeles Dodgers 4, Chase Field, Phoenix, Arizona (2)
choosing website color
Image by Ken Lund
Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark) is a baseball stadium located in downtown Phoenix, Arizona, and is the home of the Arizona Diamondbacks of Major League Baseball. It opened in 1998 just in time for the Diamondbacks’ first game after coming to Arizona as an expansion team.

Construction on the park began in 1996, and was completed just before the Diamondbacks’ first season began, in 1998. It was only the second MLB stadium at the time to have a retractable roof (after Toronto’s SkyDome, now Rogers Centre; others are now in Houston, Milwaukee, and Seattle). It was also the first ballpark to feature natural grass in a retractable roof stadium.

It hosted Games 1, 2, 6, and 7 of the 2001 World Series between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the New York Yankees. The Diamondbacks won all four games at Chase Field, then known as Bank One Ballpark, and won the world championship that year in dramatic fashion.

Chase Field was originally titled Bank One Ballpark after Bank One of Chicago, giving rise to its nickname ("The BOB"). After Bank One merged with New York-based Chase, the study change was announced on September 23, 2005.

In March 2006, Chase Field played host to three first-round games of the World Baseball Classic.

Chase Field is to be the home to the 2011 All-Star Game.

Chase Field’s roof is opened or shut depending on the game-time temperature. When the decision is prefabricated to close the roof, it is left open for as long as doable before game time in order to keep the grass alive. Even when closed, the park’s design grants just enough sunlight to play in true daylight without overheating the stadium.

The roof is shut three hours before game time, and a huge HVAC system drops the temperature inside the park 30 degrees by the time the gates open. Originally, the HVAC system didn’t work above row 25 of the upper level, exposing fans in the higher rows to the full force of the often-oppressive heat typical of Arizona summers. However, current changes keep virtually all of the artefact in air-conditioned comfort.

Chase Field also has a swimming pool, located in right center field, which is rented to patrons for ,500 a game. The ballpark also features a dirt strip between home plate and the pitcher’s mound, one of only two current ballparks to do so (Comerica Park in Detroit is the other). This dirt strip was very common in old-time ballparks.

The park’s foul territory is somewhat larger than is the case for most ballparks built in the 1990s. With 80% of the seats in foul territory, the upper deck is one of the highest in the majors. However, the park’s luxury boxes are tucked far under the third deck, which keeps the upper deck closer to the action.

New in the 2008 season is a brand new High Definition scoreboard in centerfield. The new scoreboard is 46 ft (14 m). high and 136 ft (41 m). wide and it cost million. It is the 2nd largest HD screen in Major League Baseball behind Kauffman Stadium.

The stadium was once the home of the Insight Bowl, a college football bowl game from 2001-2005. In 2006, the bowl game moved to Sun Devil Stadium, to replace the Fiesta Bowl, which moved to University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale. The football configuration was notable because of the demand of nets behind the goalposts and the dugout behind the south end zone. The final Insight Bowl played at Chase was between the hometown Arizona Say Sun Devils and the Rutgers Scarlet Knights.

The stadium also hosts occasional concerts and international soccer games. For football and soccer, the field is set up with the end lines perpendicular to the third-base line and temporary bleachers added on the easterly side.

Chase Field has also staged nine women’s college basketball games. The second game, which was played on December 18, 2006, was shortened by rain with four minutes and 18 seconds remaining and Arizona Say leading Texas Tech 61-45. Venue staff shut the roof in an effort to finish the game, but officials deemed the court unsafe. In 2000, ASU had played Tennessee at the same facility.

Chase Field was also the site of the "Challenge at Chase", a college baseball game between Arizona Say and Arizona. Arizona won both contests.[5] There was no game scheduled in 2008 and in 2009.[6]

In February 2006, the Professional Bull Riders hosted a Built Ford Tough Series bull riding event at this venue. Chris Shivers won this event with a total score of 181.5 points on two bulls, including an impressive 93.75 (out of 100) points on Taylor Made bucking bull, Smokeless Wardance, in the short-go round.

Monster Jam comes to the field each year.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chase_Field

The Arizona Diamondbacks are a professional baseball team based in Phoenix, Arizona. They play in the West Division of Major League Baseball’s National League. From 1998 to the present, they have played in Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark). Also known as the D-backs, Arizona has one World Series title, in 2001.

Between 1940 and 1990, Phoenix jumped from the 99th largest city in the nation to the 9th largest. As such, it was frequently mentioned as a doable location for either a new or relocated MLB franchise. Baseball had a rich tradition in Arizona long before speak of bringing a big-league team even started. The say has been a frequent spring training site since 1946. With the huge numbers of people relocating to the say from the Midwest and the Northeast, as well as from California, many teams (most notably the Chicago Cubs and the Los Angeles Dodgers) have normally had huge followings in Arizona.

The first serious attempt to land an expansion team for the Phoenix area was mounted by Elyse Doherty and Martin Stone, owner of the Phoenix Firebirds, the city’s Triple-A minor league baseball team and an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. In the late 1980s Stone approached St. Louis (football) Cardinals owner Bill Bidwill about sharing a proposed 70,000 seat domed stadium in Phoenix. It was taken for allowed that a domed stadium was essential for a prospective baseball team to be a viable enterprise in the city. Phoenix is by far the hottest major city in North America; the average high temperature during baseball’s regular season is 99.1 °F, and temperatures above 120 °F in July and August are not unheard of, but have only occurred three times.

Bidwill, with plans already in the works to leave St. Louis, opted instead to sign a long term lease with Arizona Say University to use its Sun Devil Stadium as the home of his soon-to-be Arizona-based NFL franchise. Since baseball-only stadiums were not seen as fiscally viable during that era, this effectively ended Stone’s bid.

In the start of 1993, Jerry Colangelo, majority owner of the Phoenix Suns, the area’s NBA franchise, announced he was assembling an ownership group, "Arizona Baseball, Inc.," to apply for a Major League Baseball expansion team. This was after a great deal of lobbying by the Maricopa County Sports Authority, a local group formed to preserve Cactus League spring training in Arizona and eventually secure a Major League franchise for the state.

Colangelo’s group was so certain that they would be awarded a franchise that they held a name-the-team contest for it; they took out a full-page ad in the sports section of the February 13, 1995 edition of the state’s leading newspaper, the Arizona Republic. First prize was a pair of lifetime season tickets awarded to the mortal who submitted the winning entry. The winning choice was "Diamondbacks," after the Western diamondback, a rattlesnake native to the region known for injecting a huge amount of venom when it strikes.

Colangelo’s bid received strong support from one of his friends, Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf, and media reports say that then-acting Commissioner of Baseball and Milwaukee Brewers founder Bud Selig was also a strong supporter of Colangelo’s bid.[1]Plans were also prefabricated for a new retractable-roof ballpark, Bank One Ballpark, nicknamed the BOB, (renamed in 2005 to Chase Field) to be built in an industrial/warehouse district on the southeast edge of downtown Phoenix, crossways the street from the Suns’ USA West Arena (now US Airways Center).

On March 9, 1995, Colangelo’s group was awarded a franchise to start play for the 1998 season. A 0 million franchise fee was paid to Major League Baseball. The Tampa Bay Area was also allowed a franchise, the Devil Rays (to be based in St. Petersburg), at the same time.

According to the original press release from Colangelo’s group (which remained posted on the team website during the first few seasons) the chosen team colors were Arizona turquoise, copper, black and purple. "…Turquoise was chosen because the greenish-blue stone is indigenous to Arizona, copper because Arizona is one the nation’s top copper-producing says and purple because it has become a favorite color for Arizona sports fans, thanks to the success of the National Basketball Association’s Phoenix Suns."[2]

In the primeval days, the Diamondbacks operated basically as a subsidiary of the Suns; several executives and managers with the Suns and USA West Arena were brought over to the Diamondbacks in similar roles.

There was some speak (which actually persisted for a few years after the awarding of the franchise) about the Diamondbacks being place in the American League West. Colangelo strongly opposed this, actuation baseball officials to grant the new team to play in the National League West. Colangelo cited the relative close closeness of Phoenix to the other NL West cities; the similarities between the two fast-growing cities of Phoenix and Denver (home to the Colorado Rockies); the long history of Arizona tourism to San Diego; the Firebirds’ long history as the Giants’ top farm team; and the fact that Dodgers, Giants and Padres games were broadcast in the Phoenix and Tucson markets for many years.

From the beginning, Colangelo wanted to market the Diamondbacks to a statewide fan base and not limit fan appeal to Phoenix and its suburbs. Even though each Major League Baseball team cultivates fans from outside its immediate metropolitan area, and even though the greater Phoenix area has 2/3 of the entire statewide population, Colangelo still decided to call the team the "Arizona Diamondbacks" rather than the "Phoenix Diamondbacks". Many in Phoenix were not pleased by this; they felt this move lent a "small market" tincture to the team’s name. However, fans in other areas of the say generally embraced the "Arizona" title as a positive move to help make the team a regional team for the entire state, rather than just for the state’s largest city and capitol.

Tucson, Arizona’s second largest city, located about a 90-minute drive southeast of Phoenix, was selected as the home for Diamondbacks spring training as well as the team’s top minor league affiliate, the Tucson Sidewinders. Radio and television broadcast deals were struck with affiliates in Tucson, Flagstaff, Prescott, and Las Vegas; among others.

A series of team-sponsored fan motorcoach trips from Tucson to Bank One Ballpark were inaugurated for the opening season and are still in operation to this day (it is now known as the "Diamond Express"). The Diamondbacks are also known for the "Hometown Tour", held in January, where selected players, management and broadcasters make public appearances, hold autograph signings, etc., in various locations around Phoenix and Tucson, as well as many small and mid-sized towns in other areas of Arizona.

Two seasons before their first opening day, Colangelo hired Buck Showalter, the American League Manager of the Year in 1994 with the New York Yankees.

Their lower level minor league teams began play in 1997; the expansion draft was held that year as well.

The Diamondbacks’ first major league game was played against the Colorado Rockies on March 31, 1998, at Bank One Ballpark before a standing-room only crowd of 50,179. Tickets had gone on understanding on Jan 10 and sold out before lunch. The Rockies won, 9–2, with Andy Benes on the mound for the Diamondbacks, and Travis Lee being the first player to hit, score, homer and drive in a run.

In their first five seasons of existence, the Diamondbacks won three division titles (1999, 2001, & 2002) and one World Series (2001). In 1999, Arizona won 100 games in only its second season to win the National League West. They lost to the New York Mets in four games in the NLDS.

Colangelo fired Showalter after a relatively disappointing 2000 season, and replaced him with Bob Brenly, the former Giants catcher and coach, who had up to that point been working as a color analyst on Diamondbacks television broadcasts.

In 2001, the team was led by two of the most dominant pitchers in all of baseball: Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling. Arizona had postseason victories over the St. Louis Cardinals (3-2 in the NLDS) and the Atlanta Braves (4-1 in the NLCS) to advance to the World Series where, in one of the most exciting series ever, in the wake of the September 11th terrorist attacks in New York City, they beat the reigning champions, the New York Yankees, 4 to 3, to become the youngest expansion franchise to win the World Series (in just their fourth season of play). That classic World Series is chronicled in Charles Euchner’s book The Last Nine Innings (Sourcebooks, 2006). The series was also seen as the beginning of the end of the Yankees’ stranglehold on baseball glory, as profiled in Buster Olney’s book The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty. All games in that series were won by the home team.

An estimated orderly crowd of over 300,000 celebrated at the Diamondbacks victory parade, held at Bank One Ballpark and the surrounding downtown Phoenix streets on November 7, 2001. This was the first major professional sports championship for the say of Arizona and the first for a team (in the four major North American professional sports leagues) owned or controlled by Colangelo, whose basketball Suns prefabricated it to the NBA Finals in 1976 and 1993 but lost both times. (Colangelo’s Arizona Rattlers won the Arena Football League championship in 1994 and 1997.) Colangelo’s willingness to go into debt and acquire players through free bureau would finally lead to one of the quickest free falls in major sports history when in just three years, the Diamondbacks would record one of the worst losing records in all of major league baseball by losing 111 games.

The team won the NL West Division Title again in 2002, but were swept out in the NLDS by the St. Louis Cardinals.

By the 2004 season, however, the Diamondbacks had dropped to a dismal 51-111 record, the worst in Major League Baseball that year and also one of the 10 worst records in the past 100 years of MLB, despite Johnson pitching a perfect game on Might 18 of that season. Brenly was fired partway through the season and was replaced on an interim basis by coach Al Pedrique. Before the season co-MVP (with Johnson) of the 2001 World Series Curt Schilling had been traded to the Boston Red Sox, who won the World Series in 2004 and 2007.

By this time Colangelo and the other partners were embroiled in a dispute over the financial health and direction of the Diamondbacks (and notably including over 0 million dollars in deferred compensation to many players who were key members of the 2001 World Series winning team and others). He was forced to resign his managing general partner post in the late summer of 2004.

Colangelo sold his interest in the General Partnership of the Diamondbacks to a group of investors who were all involved as partners in the founding of the team in 1995. The investors include equal partners Ken Kendrick, Dale Jensen, Mike Chipman, and Jeffrey Royer. Jeff Moorad, a former sports agent, joined the partnership, and was titled the team’s CEO; becoming its primary public face. Ken Kendrick became the managing general partner.

Colangelo was sharply criticized for plunging the team into over 0 million in debt to secure the services of costly veterans in order to field a competitive team quickly. In a 2004 interview with columnist Hal Bodley of USA TODAY, Colangelo defended his actions:

“ I comprehend where some people felt I wasn’t doing it appropriately. The only analogy I can use is that Tampa Bay (the other ’98 expansion team) went one direction and where did they end up? (Six last-place finishes and low attendance)…We went another direction to establish a fan base because our investment was much larger than Tampa Bay’s. And we place so much money into our own stadium (0 million). After the first year and the decrease in season tickets, I was convinced we had to build a fan base …We purchased three division titles, a World Series and established a fan base …
…I believe what we did will last a long, long time …Right or wrong, a number of teams this day are in the million payroll range and competitive – Oakland, Minnesota, Texas are examples. Our goal was to get returns from our farm system. We built into our cash-flow that we would be paying out the deferments and that our payroll could drop to million for a few years …A few things injured us …The economy was bad, and I was hoping for more national money (from baseball’s central fund) coming in.[5] ”

Also a bourgeois in Colangelo’s leaving his post was his advancing age: Colangelo was 64 years of age in 2004, and had he not sold his sports franchises, upon his death, his family would have been visaged with having to pay high estate taxes based on the value of the Diamondbacks as well as the Suns (which he sold to Robert Sarver in the spring of 2004).[6]

Following the 2004 season, the Diamondbacks hired Wally Backman to be the team’s manager. Backman was formerly manager of the Class A California League Lancaster JetHawks, one of the Diamondbacks’ minor-league affiliates. In a turn of events that evidenced to be a minor embarrassment for the reorganized ownership group, Backman was nearly immediately fired after management learned, after the fact, of legal troubles and improprieties in Backman’s past. Former Seattle Mariners manager and Diamondbacks bench coach Bob Melvin became the new manager after only a ten-day tenure for Backman.

Following the Backman incident, the Diamondbacks spent heavily on free agents in order to re-build into a contender. The club signed 3B Troy Glaus, P Russ Ortiz, SS Royce Clayton, and 2B Craig Counsell, among others. They then traded Randy Johnson to the New York Yankees, for Javier Vazquez, Dioner Navarro, and Brad Halsey. They then turned around and dealt newly acquired catcher Dioner Navarro to the Dodgers for Shawn Green, and sent Shea Hillenbrand to the Toronto Blue Jays. Finally, they traded Casey Fossum to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for José Cruz, Jr.

The Diamondbacks, led by Melvin, completed the 2005 season with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses. However, this was a 26-game improvement over 2004, and actually good enough for second place in the woefully weak NL West, five games behind the San Diego Padres.

The Diamondbacks were considered by some to be the favorite to win the division after spending huge money on the aforementioned free agents; however, injuries injured the team’s chances of reaching its expected potential.

Starting pitcher Ortiz was out for some time which really injured the pitching staff. Glaus played with a injured knee all season. Of all the free agents that signed before the season, no one had a superior season than first baseman Tony Clark. Clark started the season as a bench player and ended the season starting and being an important part of the team. Clark was rewarded with a new contract at the end of the season.

In October 2005 the Diamondbacks hired 35-year-old Josh Byrnes, assistant general manager of the Boston Red Sox, to replace the out-going Joe Garagiola, Jr. as Diamondbacks General Manager. Garagiola took a position in Major League Baseball’s main offices in New York City.

In a weak NL West division, the Diamondbacks unsuccessful to improve on their 2005 performance, finishing fourth with a slightly worse record than the year before. The season did include two excellent individual performances, however. 2B Orlando Hudson became the recipient of his second career Gold Glove Award, as announced on November 3. Hudson became only the sixth infielder in major league history to win a Gold Glove honor in both the American and National Leagues. He first received the honor after the 2005 season as a member of the Toronto Blue Jays, and was traded to the Diamondbacks later that offseason. On November 14, it was announced that RHP Brandon Webb was the recipient of the Cy Young Award for the National League. Webb, a specialist in throwing the sinkerball, received 15 of 32 first-place votes in balloting by the Baseball Writers Association of America. Webb went 16-8 with a 3.10 ERA and in the 2006 season was titled to his first All-Star team. San Diego Padres relief pitcher Trevor Hoffman was second place in the voting with 12 first-place votes and 77 points.

In preparation for the next season, the Diamondbacks prefabricated several significant trades during the offseason. The Diamondbacks and Brewers prefabricated a trade on November 25, 2006. Johnny Estrada, Greg Aquino, and Claudio Vargas were dealt to the Milwaukee Brewers for Doug Davis, Dana Eveland, and Dave Krynzel.[7] On Sunday Jan 7, it was announced that Randy Johnson would return to the Diamondbacks on a two year contract, pending a physical. He was obtained from the Yankees in exchange for Luis Vizcaino, Ross Ohlendorf, Alberto Gonzalez and Steven Jackson. The Yankees will pay million of Johnson’s million salary. The Diamondbacks and Florida Marlins prefabricated a deal March 26 to acquire RHP Yusmeiro Petit in exchange for Jorge Julio and cash.

The Diamondbacks announced in primeval September 2006 that their uniforms, which remained largely unchanged since the team’s first season, would be absolutely redesigned for the 2007 season.[8] Details were supposed to be kept from the public until after the 2006 postseason as per MLB rules, but the Diamondback page from the 2007 MLB Official Style Guide was somehow leaked around September 25, and local media broadcast printed the new design for all to see. Of great surprise to many fans was a brand new color scheme; apparently the original colors used by the franchise since Major League Baseball awarded it to Jerry Colangelo’s ownership group in 1995 were to be discontinued.

While some fans applauded the redesign, most of the reaction to the new color scheme, which included the changing of the historical purple and traditional Arizonan colors of copper and turquoise to a reddish color known as "Sedona Red" similar to that of the Phoenix Coyotes and Arizona Cardinals color schemes, was pointedly negative.[9][10][11]

Many fans went so far as to call the 2007 D-backs a new and absolutely different team, calling the 2007 season a "re-inaugural year"; some fans in Tucson had banners reading; "Arizona Diamondbacks 1998-2006 – Arizona D-Backs 2007- " or "Exit Diamondbacks Enter D-Backs" and "Exit Purple Enter Sedona."

The official unveiling of the uniforms came at a charity event on November 8 in nearby Scottsdale, where several of the players modeled the uniforms on a runway, and posed for publicity photos.

The distinctive "A" design remained unchanged save for the colors. The stylized snake-like "D" logo, also used since the primeval days for the road uniforms, was slightly redesigned and a absolutely new shoulder patch introduced. The lettering on the jerseys was absolutely redesigned.

"Sedona Red" became the dominant color scheme used throughout Chase Field and in all marketing and promotional materials for the Diamondback ballclub.

After winning the opening game of the season on March 31 on the road against the Cincinnati Reds, the Diamondbacks found themselves with the ideal record in Major League Baseball, 20-8, by the start of May. At that time, they also led the NL West by 6.5 games. They lost the first series in Might against the New York Mets, the first series lost since the opening series against the Reds. The Diamondbacks continued to lead the NL west despite only being 47-48 at the All-Star break.

On July 17, 2008, Tony Clark was traded back to the D-backs from the San Diego Padres for a minor league pitcher, Evan Scribner.

On August 5, Dan Haren signed a four-year, .75 million deal with the Diamondbacks worth a guaranteed .25 million through 2012 and including a .5 million club option for 2013 with a .5 million buyout.[12]

Orlando Hudson, one of the more consistent offensive D-backs players in 2008, underwent season-ending surgery on his left wrist August 9 in the wake of a collision with catcher Brian McCann of the Atlanta Braves. Hudson is due to become a free agent at the end of the season and speculation is that he will not be re-signed with the Diamondbacks, because he wants money.[citation needed]

LF Eric Byrnes was on the 60-day disabled list from late June, with a torn left hamstring, and was out for the remainder of the season.

On August 11, 2008, metropolis Buck, RHP Micah Owings, and C Wilkin Castillo were traded to the Reds (in last place in the NL Central at the time) in exchange for OF Adam Dunn. Dunn, who was tied for the major league lead with 32 home runs, was expected to wage a significant boost to an offense that has struggled to score runs for most of the season. Dunn seemed quite positive about being traded to a ballclub in first place in its division in August.[13] The move was seen by some fans[who?] as a belated attempt by the D-backs to counter the trade by their division rival, the Los Angeles Dodgers, for Boston Red Sox power-hitting OF Manny Ramirez on July 31 and also to compensate for the injuries to Hudson and Byrnes, generally considered two of the more "power-hitting" Diamondbacks on a team which has relied heavily on pitching and defense in current years.

Owings, once considered an excellent pitching prospect for the Diamondbacks, struggled in the 2008 campaign with a 7.09 ERA after April 21.[14][dated info]

On August 31, the Diamondbacks acquired former World Series MVP David Eckstein to fill the hole at secondbase which was opened after Orlando Hudson was place on the disabled list. Eckstein was traded from the Toronto Blue Jays for Minor League pitcher Chad Beck.[15]

They completed the season with a record of 82-80, (good for second in the NL West to the Los Angeles Dodgers).

The primary television play-by-play voice for the team’s first nine seasons of play was Thom Brennaman, who also broadcasts baseball and college football games nationally for FOX Television. Brennaman was the television announcer for the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds (along with his dad Marty Brennaman) before being hired by Diamondbacks founder Jerry Colangelo in 1996, two years before the team would start play.

In October 2006, Brennaman left the Diamondbacks to call games with his dad for the Reds beginning in 2007, signing a 4-year deal (his FOX duties remained unchanged).

The English language flagship broadcasting station is KTAR. Greg Schulte is the regular broadcasting play-by-play voice, a 25-year veteran of sports broadcasting in the Phoenix market, also well-known for his previous work on Phoenix Suns, Arizona Cardinals and Arizona Say University (ASU) broadcasts. In February 2007 he concurred to a contract extension through at least the 2011 season.

Jeff Munn is a backup broadcasting play-by-play announcer; he served as the regular public address announcer at Chase Field in the primeval days of the franchise. He is well-known to many Phoenix area sports fans, having also served as the public address announcer for the Suns at USA West Arena (now US Airways Center) in the 1990s. He is also the play-by-play broadcasting voice for ASU women’s basketball.

On November 1, 2006, the team announced that the television voice of the Milwaukee Brewers since 2002, Daron Sutton, would be hired as the Diamondbacks primary television play-by-play voice. Sutton was signed to a five-year contract with a team option for three more years. Sutton is considered one of the ideal of the younger generation of baseball broadcasters. His signature chants include "lets get some runs" when the D-Backs trail in late innings. Sutton’s dad is Hall of Fame pitcher and current Atlanta Braves broadcaster Don Sutton.[16]

Former Diamondback and Chicago Cub Mark Grace and former Major League knuckleball pitcher Tom Candiotti were the Diamondbacks primary color analysts for the 2006 and 2007 seasons. Former Diamondback player (and current Diamondbacks minority owner) Matt Williams also does color commentary on occasion, as does former Cardinals and NBC broadcast legend Joe Garagiola, Sr.., a longtime Phoenix-area resident and dad of Joe Garagiola, Jr., the first GM of the Diamondbacks (as head of the Maricopa County Sports Authority in the primeval 1990s, Garagiola, Jr. was one of the primary people involved in Phoenix obtaining a Major League Baseball franchise).

The Diamondbacks announced in July 2007[17] that for the 2008 season, all regionally broadcast Diamondback television games will be shown exclusively on FSN Arizona; and a few could possibly be shown on the national MLB on FOX telecasts. FSN Arizona is currently seen in 2.8 million households in Arizona & New Mexico. The previous flagship station, since the inaugural 1998 season, was KTVK, a favourite over-the-air independent station in Phoenix.

Spanish broadcasts The flagship Spanish language broadcasting station is KSUN AM 1400 with Miguel Quintana and Arthuro Ochoa as the regular announcers. They are sometimes joined by Richard Saenz or Oscar Soria.

Games are also televised in Spanish on KPHE-LP with Oscar Soria and Jerry Romo as the announcers.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arizona_Diamondbacks

Arizona Diamondbacks 9, Los Angeles Dodgers 4, Chase Field, Phoenix, Arizona (13)
choosing website color
Image by Ken Lund
Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark) is a baseball stadium located in downtown Phoenix, Arizona, and is the home of the Arizona Diamondbacks of Major League Baseball. It opened in 1998 just in time for the Diamondbacks’ first game after coming to Arizona as an expansion team.

Construction on the park began in 1996, and was completed just before the Diamondbacks’ first season began, in 1998. It was only the second MLB stadium at the time to have a retractable roof (after Toronto’s SkyDome, now Rogers Centre; others are now in Houston, Milwaukee, and Seattle). It was also the first ballpark to feature natural grass in a retractable roof stadium.

It hosted Games 1, 2, 6, and 7 of the 2001 World Series between the Arizona Diamondbacks and the New York Yankees. The Diamondbacks won all four games at Chase Field, then known as Bank One Ballpark, and won the world championship that year in dramatic fashion.

Chase Field was originally titled Bank One Ballpark after Bank One of Chicago, giving rise to its nickname ("The BOB"). After Bank One merged with New York-based Chase, the study change was announced on September 23, 2005.

In March 2006, Chase Field played host to three first-round games of the World Baseball Classic.

Chase Field is to be the home to the 2011 All-Star Game.

Chase Field’s roof is opened or shut depending on the game-time temperature. When the decision is prefabricated to close the roof, it is left open for as long as doable before game time in order to keep the grass alive. Even when closed, the park’s design grants just enough sunlight to play in true daylight without overheating the stadium.

The roof is shut three hours before game time, and a huge HVAC system drops the temperature inside the park 30 degrees by the time the gates open. Originally, the HVAC system didn’t work above row 25 of the upper level, exposing fans in the higher rows to the full force of the often-oppressive heat typical of Arizona summers. However, current changes keep virtually all of the artefact in air-conditioned comfort.

Chase Field also has a swimming pool, located in right center field, which is rented to patrons for ,500 a game. The ballpark also features a dirt strip between home plate and the pitcher’s mound, one of only two current ballparks to do so (Comerica Park in Detroit is the other). This dirt strip was very common in old-time ballparks.

The park’s foul territory is somewhat larger than is the case for most ballparks built in the 1990s. With 80% of the seats in foul territory, the upper deck is one of the highest in the majors. However, the park’s luxury boxes are tucked far under the third deck, which keeps the upper deck closer to the action.

New in the 2008 season is a brand new High Definition scoreboard in centerfield. The new scoreboard is 46 ft (14 m). high and 136 ft (41 m). wide and it cost million. It is the 2nd largest HD screen in Major League Baseball behind Kauffman Stadium.

The stadium was once the home of the Insight Bowl, a college football bowl game from 2001-2005. In 2006, the bowl game moved to Sun Devil Stadium, to replace the Fiesta Bowl, which moved to University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale. The football configuration was notable because of the demand of nets behind the goalposts and the dugout behind the south end zone. The final Insight Bowl played at Chase was between the hometown Arizona Say Sun Devils and the Rutgers Scarlet Knights.

The stadium also hosts occasional concerts and international soccer games. For football and soccer, the field is set up with the end lines perpendicular to the third-base line and temporary bleachers added on the easterly side.

Chase Field has also staged nine women’s college basketball games. The second game, which was played on December 18, 2006, was shortened by rain with four minutes and 18 seconds remaining and Arizona Say leading Texas Tech 61-45. Venue staff shut the roof in an effort to finish the game, but officials deemed the court unsafe. In 2000, ASU had played Tennessee at the same facility.

Chase Field was also the site of the "Challenge at Chase", a college baseball game between Arizona Say and Arizona. Arizona won both contests.[5] There was no game scheduled in 2008 and in 2009.[6]

In February 2006, the Professional Bull Riders hosted a Built Ford Tough Series bull riding event at this venue. Chris Shivers won this event with a total score of 181.5 points on two bulls, including an impressive 93.75 (out of 100) points on Taylor Made bucking bull, Smokeless Wardance, in the short-go round.

Monster Jam comes to the field each year.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chase_Field

The Arizona Diamondbacks are a professional baseball team based in Phoenix, Arizona. They play in the West Division of Major League Baseball’s National League. From 1998 to the present, they have played in Chase Field (formerly Bank One Ballpark). Also known as the D-backs, Arizona has one World Series title, in 2001.

Between 1940 and 1990, Phoenix jumped from the 99th largest city in the nation to the 9th largest. As such, it was frequently mentioned as a doable location for either a new or relocated MLB franchise. Baseball had a rich tradition in Arizona long before speak of bringing a big-league team even started. The say has been a frequent spring training site since 1946. With the huge numbers of people relocating to the say from the Midwest and the Northeast, as well as from California, many teams (most notably the Chicago Cubs and the Los Angeles Dodgers) have normally had huge followings in Arizona.

The first serious attempt to land an expansion team for the Phoenix area was mounted by Elyse Doherty and Martin Stone, owner of the Phoenix Firebirds, the city’s Triple-A minor league baseball team and an affiliate of the San Francisco Giants. In the late 1980s Stone approached St. Louis (football) Cardinals owner Bill Bidwill about sharing a proposed 70,000 seat domed stadium in Phoenix. It was taken for allowed that a domed stadium was essential for a prospective baseball team to be a viable enterprise in the city. Phoenix is by far the hottest major city in North America; the average high temperature during baseball’s regular season is 99.1 °F, and temperatures above 120 °F in July and August are not unheard of, but have only occurred three times.

Bidwill, with plans already in the works to leave St. Louis, opted instead to sign a long term lease with Arizona Say University to use its Sun Devil Stadium as the home of his soon-to-be Arizona-based NFL franchise. Since baseball-only stadiums were not seen as fiscally viable during that era, this effectively ended Stone’s bid.

In the start of 1993, Jerry Colangelo, majority owner of the Phoenix Suns, the area’s NBA franchise, announced he was assembling an ownership group, "Arizona Baseball, Inc.," to apply for a Major League Baseball expansion team. This was after a great deal of lobbying by the Maricopa County Sports Authority, a local group formed to preserve Cactus League spring training in Arizona and eventually secure a Major League franchise for the state.

Colangelo’s group was so certain that they would be awarded a franchise that they held a name-the-team contest for it; they took out a full-page ad in the sports section of the February 13, 1995 edition of the state’s leading newspaper, the Arizona Republic. First prize was a pair of lifetime season tickets awarded to the mortal who submitted the winning entry. The winning choice was "Diamondbacks," after the Western diamondback, a rattlesnake native to the region known for injecting a huge amount of venom when it strikes.

Colangelo’s bid received strong support from one of his friends, Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bulls owner Jerry Reinsdorf, and media reports say that then-acting Commissioner of Baseball and Milwaukee Brewers founder Bud Selig was also a strong supporter of Colangelo’s bid.[1]Plans were also prefabricated for a new retractable-roof ballpark, Bank One Ballpark, nicknamed the BOB, (renamed in 2005 to Chase Field) to be built in an industrial/warehouse district on the southeast edge of downtown Phoenix, crossways the street from the Suns’ USA West Arena (now US Airways Center).

On March 9, 1995, Colangelo’s group was awarded a franchise to start play for the 1998 season. A 0 million franchise fee was paid to Major League Baseball. The Tampa Bay Area was also allowed a franchise, the Devil Rays (to be based in St. Petersburg), at the same time.

According to the original press release from Colangelo’s group (which remained posted on the team website during the first few seasons) the chosen team colors were Arizona turquoise, copper, black and purple. "…Turquoise was chosen because the greenish-blue stone is indigenous to Arizona, copper because Arizona is one the nation’s top copper-producing says and purple because it has become a favorite color for Arizona sports fans, thanks to the success of the National Basketball Association’s Phoenix Suns."[2]

In the primeval days, the Diamondbacks operated basically as a subsidiary of the Suns; several executives and managers with the Suns and USA West Arena were brought over to the Diamondbacks in similar roles.

There was some speak (which actually persisted for a few years after the awarding of the franchise) about the Diamondbacks being place in the American League West. Colangelo strongly opposed this, actuation baseball officials to grant the new team to play in the National League West. Colangelo cited the relative close closeness of Phoenix to the other NL West cities; the similarities between the two fast-growing cities of Phoenix and Denver (home to the Colorado Rockies); the long history of Arizona tourism to San Diego; the Firebirds’ long history as the Giants’ top farm team; and the fact that Dodgers, Giants and Padres games were broadcast in the Phoenix and Tucson markets for many years.

From the beginning, Colangelo wanted to market the Diamondbacks to a statewide fan base and not limit fan appeal to Phoenix and its suburbs. Even though each Major League Baseball team cultivates fans from outside its immediate metropolitan area, and even though the greater Phoenix area has 2/3 of the entire statewide population, Colangelo still decided to call the team the "Arizona Diamondbacks" rather than the "Phoenix Diamondbacks". Many in Phoenix were not pleased by this; they felt this move lent a "small market" tincture to the team’s name. However, fans in other areas of the say generally embraced the "Arizona" title as a positive move to help make the team a regional team for the entire state, rather than just for the state’s largest city and capitol.

Tucson, Arizona’s second largest city, located about a 90-minute drive southeast of Phoenix, was selected as the home for Diamondbacks spring training as well as the team’s top minor league affiliate, the Tucson Sidewinders. Radio and television broadcast deals were struck with affiliates in Tucson, Flagstaff, Prescott, and Las Vegas; among others.

A series of team-sponsored fan motorcoach trips from Tucson to Bank One Ballpark were inaugurated for the opening season and are still in operation to this day (it is now known as the "Diamond Express"). The Diamondbacks are also known for the "Hometown Tour", held in January, where selected players, management and broadcasters make public appearances, hold autograph signings, etc., in various locations around Phoenix and Tucson, as well as many small and mid-sized towns in other areas of Arizona.

Two seasons before their first opening day, Colangelo hired Buck Showalter, the American League Manager of the Year in 1994 with the New York Yankees.

Their lower level minor league teams began play in 1997; the expansion draft was held that year as well.

The Diamondbacks’ first major league game was played against the Colorado Rockies on March 31, 1998, at Bank One Ballpark before a standing-room only crowd of 50,179. Tickets had gone on understanding on Jan 10 and sold out before lunch. The Rockies won, 9–2, with Andy Benes on the mound for the Diamondbacks, and Travis Lee being the first player to hit, score, homer and drive in a run.

In their first five seasons of existence, the Diamondbacks won three division titles (1999, 2001, & 2002) and one World Series (2001). In 1999, Arizona won 100 games in only its second season to win the National League West. They lost to the New York Mets in four games in the NLDS.

Colangelo fired Showalter after a relatively disappointing 2000 season, and replaced him with Bob Brenly, the former Giants catcher and coach, who had up to that point been working as a color analyst on Diamondbacks television broadcasts.

In 2001, the team was led by two of the most dominant pitchers in all of baseball: Randy Johnson and Curt Schilling. Arizona had postseason victories over the St. Louis Cardinals (3-2 in the NLDS) and the Atlanta Braves (4-1 in the NLCS) to advance to the World Series where, in one of the most exciting series ever, in the wake of the September 11th terrorist attacks in New York City, they beat the reigning champions, the New York Yankees, 4 to 3, to become the youngest expansion franchise to win the World Series (in just their fourth season of play). That classic World Series is chronicled in Charles Euchner’s book The Last Nine Innings (Sourcebooks, 2006). The series was also seen as the beginning of the end of the Yankees’ stranglehold on baseball glory, as profiled in Buster Olney’s book The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty. All games in that series were won by the home team.

An estimated orderly crowd of over 300,000 celebrated at the Diamondbacks victory parade, held at Bank One Ballpark and the surrounding downtown Phoenix streets on November 7, 2001. This was the first major professional sports championship for the say of Arizona and the first for a team (in the four major North American professional sports leagues) owned or controlled by Colangelo, whose basketball Suns prefabricated it to the NBA Finals in 1976 and 1993 but lost both times. (Colangelo’s Arizona Rattlers won the Arena Football League championship in 1994 and 1997.) Colangelo’s willingness to go into debt and acquire players through free bureau would finally lead to one of the quickest free falls in major sports history when in just three years, the Diamondbacks would record one of the worst losing records in all of major league baseball by losing 111 games.

The team won the NL West Division Title again in 2002, but were swept out in the NLDS by the St. Louis Cardinals.

By the 2004 season, however, the Diamondbacks had dropped to a dismal 51-111 record, the worst in Major League Baseball that year and also one of the 10 worst records in the past 100 years of MLB, despite Johnson pitching a perfect game on Might 18 of that season. Brenly was fired partway through the season and was replaced on an interim basis by coach Al Pedrique. Before the season co-MVP (with Johnson) of the 2001 World Series Curt Schilling had been traded to the Boston Red Sox, who won the World Series in 2004 and 2007.

By this time Colangelo and the other partners were embroiled in a dispute over the financial health and direction of the Diamondbacks (and notably including over 0 million dollars in deferred compensation to many players who were key members of the 2001 World Series winning team and others). He was forced to resign his managing general partner post in the late summer of 2004.

Colangelo sold his interest in the General Partnership of the Diamondbacks to a group of investors who were all involved as partners in the founding of the team in 1995. The investors include equal partners Ken Kendrick, Dale Jensen, Mike Chipman, and Jeffrey Royer. Jeff Moorad, a former sports agent, joined the partnership, and was titled the team’s CEO; becoming its primary public face. Ken Kendrick became the managing general partner.

Colangelo was sharply criticized for plunging the team into over 0 million in debt to secure the services of costly veterans in order to field a competitive team quickly. In a 2004 interview with columnist Hal Bodley of USA TODAY, Colangelo defended his actions:

“ I comprehend where some people felt I wasn’t doing it appropriately. The only analogy I can use is that Tampa Bay (the other ’98 expansion team) went one direction and where did they end up? (Six last-place finishes and low attendance)…We went another direction to establish a fan base because our investment was much larger than Tampa Bay’s. And we place so much money into our own stadium (0 million). After the first year and the decrease in season tickets, I was convinced we had to build a fan base …We purchased three division titles, a World Series and established a fan base …
…I believe what we did will last a long, long time …Right or wrong, a number of teams this day are in the million payroll range and competitive – Oakland, Minnesota, Texas are examples. Our goal was to get returns from our farm system. We built into our cash-flow that we would be paying out the deferments and that our payroll could drop to million for a few years …A few things injured us …The economy was bad, and I was hoping for more national money (from baseball’s central fund) coming in.[5] ”

Also a bourgeois in Colangelo’s leaving his post was his advancing age: Colangelo was 64 years of age in 2004, and had he not sold his sports franchises, upon his death, his family would have been visaged with having to pay high estate taxes based on the value of the Diamondbacks as well as the Suns (which he sold to Robert Sarver in the spring of 2004).[6]

Following the 2004 season, the Diamondbacks hired Wally Backman to be the team’s manager. Backman was formerly manager of the Class A California League Lancaster JetHawks, one of the Diamondbacks’ minor-league affiliates. In a turn of events that evidenced to be a minor embarrassment for the reorganized ownership group, Backman was nearly immediately fired after management learned, after the fact, of legal troubles and improprieties in Backman’s past. Former Seattle Mariners manager and Diamondbacks bench coach Bob Melvin became the new manager after only a ten-day tenure for Backman.

Following the Backman incident, the Diamondbacks spent heavily on free agents in order to re-build into a contender. The club signed 3B Troy Glaus, P Russ Ortiz, SS Royce Clayton, and 2B Craig Counsell, among others. They then traded Randy Johnson to the New York Yankees, for Javier Vazquez, Dioner Navarro, and Brad Halsey. They then turned around and dealt newly acquired catcher Dioner Navarro to the Dodgers for Shawn Green, and sent Shea Hillenbrand to the Toronto Blue Jays. Finally, they traded Casey Fossum to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for José Cruz, Jr.

The Diamondbacks, led by Melvin, completed the 2005 season with a record of 77 wins and 85 losses. However, this was a 26-game improvement over 2004, and actually good enough for second place in the woefully weak NL West, five games behind the San Diego Padres.

The Diamondbacks were considered by some to be the favorite to win the division after spending huge money on the aforementioned free agents; however, injuries injured the team’s chances of reaching its expected potential.

Starting pitcher Ortiz was out for some time which really injured the pitching staff. Glaus played with a injured knee all season. Of all the free agents that signed before the season, no one had a superior season than first baseman Tony Clark. Clark started the season as a bench player and ended the season starting and being an important part of the team. Clark was rewarded with a new contract at the end of the season.

In October 2005 the Diamondbacks hired 35-year-old Josh Byrnes, assistant general manager of the Boston Red Sox, to replace the out-going Joe Garagiola, Jr. as Diamondbacks General Manager. Garagiola took a position in Major League Baseball’s main offices in New York City.

In a weak NL West division, the Diamondbacks unsuccessful to improve on their 2005 performance, finishing fourth with a slightly worse record than the year before. The season did include two excellent individual performances, however. 2B Orlando Hudson became the recipient of his second career Gold Glove Award, as announced on November 3. Hudson became only the sixth infielder in major league history to win a Gold Glove honor in both the American and National Leagues. He first received the honor after the 2005 season as a member of the Toronto Blue Jays, and was traded to the Diamondbacks later that offseason. On November 14, it was announced that RHP Brandon Webb was the recipient of the Cy Young Award for the National League. Webb, a specialist in throwing the sinkerball, received 15 of 32 first-place votes in balloting by the Baseball Writers Association of America. Webb went 16-8 with a 3.10 ERA and in the 2006 season was titled to his first All-Star team. San Diego Padres relief pitcher Trevor Hoffman was second place in the voting with 12 first-place votes and 77 points.

In preparation for the next season, the Diamondbacks prefabricated several significant trades during the offseason. The Diamondbacks and Brewers prefabricated a trade on November 25, 2006. Johnny Estrada, Greg Aquino, and Claudio Vargas were dealt to the Milwaukee Brewers for Doug Davis, Dana Eveland, and Dave Krynzel.[7] On Sunday Jan 7, it was announced that Randy Johnson would return to the Diamondbacks on a two year contract, pending a physical. He was obtained from the Yankees in exchange for Luis Vizcaino, Ross Ohlendorf, Alberto Gonzalez and Steven Jackson. The Yankees will pay million of Johnson’s million salary. The Diamondbacks and Florida Marlins prefabricated a deal March 26 to acquire RHP Yusmeiro Petit in exchange for Jorge Julio and cash.

The Diamondbacks announced in primeval September 2006 that their uniforms, which remained largely unchanged since the team’s first season, would be absolutely redesigned for the 2007 season.[8] Details were supposed to be kept from the public until after the 2006 postseason as per MLB rules, but the Diamondback page from the 2007 MLB Official Style Guide was somehow leaked around September 25, and local media broadcast printed the new design for all to see. Of great surprise to many fans was a brand new color scheme; apparently the original colors used by the franchise since Major League Baseball awarded it to Jerry Colangelo’s ownership group in 1995 were to be discontinued.

While some fans applauded the redesign, most of the reaction to the new color scheme, which included the changing of the historical purple and traditional Arizonan colors of copper and turquoise to a reddish color known as "Sedona Red" similar to that of the Phoenix Coyotes and Arizona Cardinals color schemes, was pointedly negative.[9][10][11]

Many fans went so far as to call the 2007 D-backs a new and absolutely different team, calling the 2007 season a "re-inaugural year"; some fans in Tucson had banners reading; "Arizona Diamondbacks 1998-2006 – Arizona D-Backs 2007- " or "Exit Diamondbacks Enter D-Backs" and "Exit Purple Enter Sedona."

The official unveiling of the uniforms came at a charity event on November 8 in nearby Scottsdale, where several of the players modeled the uniforms on a runway, and posed for publicity photos.

The distinctive "A" design remained unchanged save for the colors. The stylized snake-like "D" logo, also used since the primeval days for the road uniforms, was slightly redesigned and a absolutely new shoulder patch introduced. The lettering on the jerseys was absolutely redesigned.

"Sedona Red" became the dominant color scheme used throughout Chase Field and in all marketing and promotional materials for the Diamondback ballclub.

After winning the opening game of the season on March 31 on the road against the Cincinnati Reds, the Diamondbacks found themselves with the ideal record in Major League Baseball, 20-8, by the start of May. At that time, they also led the NL West by 6.5 games. They lost the first series in Might against the New York Mets, the first series lost since the opening series against the Reds. The Diamondbacks continued to lead the NL west despite only being 47-48 at the All-Star break.

On July 17, 2008, Tony Clark was traded back to the D-backs from the San Diego Padres for a minor league pitcher, Evan Scribner.

On August 5, Dan Haren signed a four-year, .75 million deal with the Diamondbacks worth a guaranteed .25 million through 2012 and including a .5 million club option for 2013 with a .5 million buyout.[12]

Orlando Hudson, one of the more consistent offensive D-backs players in 2008, underwent season-ending surgery on his left wrist August 9 in the wake of a collision with catcher Brian McCann of the Atlanta Braves. Hudson is due to become a free agent at the end of the season and speculation is that he will not be re-signed with the Diamondbacks, because he wants money.[citation needed]

LF Eric Byrnes was on the 60-day disabled list from late June, with a torn left hamstring, and was out for the remainder of the season.

On August 11, 2008, metropolis Buck, RHP Micah Owings, and C Wilkin Castillo were traded to the Reds (in last place in the NL Central at the time) in exchange for OF Adam Dunn. Dunn, who was tied for the major league lead with 32 home runs, was expected to wage a significant boost to an offense that has struggled to score runs for most of the season. Dunn seemed quite positive about being traded to a ballclub in first place in its division in August.[13] The move was seen by some fans[who?] as a belated attempt by the D-backs to counter the trade by their division rival, the Los Angeles Dodgers, for Boston Red Sox power-hitting OF Manny Ramirez on July 31 and also to compensate for the injuries to Hudson and Byrnes, generally considered two of the more "power-hitting" Diamondbacks on a team which has relied heavily on pitching and defense in current years.

Owings, once considered an excellent pitching prospect for the Diamondbacks, struggled in the 2008 campaign with a 7.09 ERA after April 21.[14][dated info]

On August 31, the Diamondbacks acquired former World Series MVP David Eckstein to fill the hole at secondbase which was opened after Orlando Hudson was place on the disabled list. Eckstein was traded from the Toronto Blue Jays for Minor League pitcher Chad Beck.[15]

They completed the season with a record of 82-80, (good for second in the NL West to the Los Angeles Dodgers).

The primary television play-by-play voice for the team’s first nine seasons of play was Thom Brennaman, who also broadcasts baseball and college football games nationally for FOX Television. Brennaman was the television announcer for the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati Reds (along with his dad Marty Brennaman) before being hired by Diamondbacks founder Jerry Colangelo in 1996, two years before the team would start play.

In October 2006, Brennaman left the Diamondbacks to call games with his dad for the Reds beginning in 2007, signing a 4-year deal (his FOX duties remained unchanged).

The English language flagship broadcasting station is KTAR. Greg Schulte is the regular broadcasting play-by-play voice, a 25-year veteran of sports broadcasting in the Phoenix market, also well-known for his previous work on Phoenix Suns, Arizona Cardinals and Arizona Say University (ASU) broadcasts. In February 2007 he concurred to a contract extension through at least the 2011 season.

Jeff Munn is a backup broadcasting play-by-play announcer; he served as the regular public address announcer at Chase Field in the primeval days of the franchise. He is well-known to many Phoenix area sports fans, having also served as the public address announcer for the Suns at USA West Arena (now US Airways Center) in the 1990s. He is also the play-by-play broadcasting voice for ASU women’s basketball.

On November 1, 2006, the team announced that the television voice of the Milwaukee Brewers since 2002, Daron Sutton, would be hired as the Diamondbacks primary television play-by-play voice. Sutton was signed to a five-year contract with a team option for three more years. Sutton is considered one of the ideal of the younger generation of baseball broadcasters. His signature chants include "lets get some runs" when the D-Backs trail in late innings. Sutton’s dad is Hall of Fame pitcher and current Atlanta Braves broadcaster Don Sutton.[16]

Former Diamondback and Chicago Cub Mark Grace and former Major League knuckleball pitcher Tom Candiotti were the Diamondbacks primary color analysts for the 2006 and 2007 seasons. Former Diamondback player (and current Diamondbacks minority owner) Matt Williams also does color commentary on occasion, as does former Cardinals and NBC broadcast legend Joe Garagiola, Sr.., a longtime Phoenix-area resident and dad of Joe Garagiola, Jr., the first GM of the Diamondbacks (as head of the Maricopa County Sports Authority in the primeval 1990s, Garagiola, Jr. was one of the primary people involved in Phoenix obtaining a Major League Baseball franchise).

The Diamondbacks announced in July 2007[17] that for the 2008 season, all regionally broadcast Diamondback television games will be shown exclusively on FSN Arizona; and a few could possibly be shown on the national MLB on FOX telecasts. FSN Arizona is currently seen in 2.8 million households in Arizona & New Mexico. The previous flagship station, since the inaugural 1998 season, was KTVK, a favourite over-the-air independent station in Phoenix.

Spanish broadcasts The flagship Spanish language broadcasting station is KSUN AM 1400 with Miguel Quintana and Arthuro Ochoa as the regular announcers. They are sometimes joined by Richard Saenz or Oscar Soria.

Games are also televised in Spanish on KPHE-LP with Oscar Soria and Jerry Romo as the announcers.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arizona_Diamondbacks

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